Tag Archives: book reviews

The Soapbox: Refusing To Review Books Marketed To One Gender Is Counterproductive

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The British newspaper The Independent announced yesterday that it would no longer be reviewing any book that was specifically marketed at one gender. While their announcement certainly did its job – garnering a wave of free publicity for the newspaper and allowing them to slap their own backs quite forcefully – it’s not helping the young men and women they claim to be looking out for or the authors whose books will be measured by these new standards.

Most authors have little to no say in how the books they write are marketed. Those decisions are made by highers-up at publishing companies, with the actual writer just hoping that their book will manage to somehow stand out from the pack of new releases. Choosing to boycott a book based on to whom it’s being marketed is kind of like boycotting a band based on who goes to their concerts – there is not much that the actual creator of the work can do. Keep reading »

Readers, Send Us Your Book Recommendations!

In our semi-regular “What Are We Reading This Week?” feature, The Frisky ladies tell you all the good books that keep us up past our bedtimes. Now it’s your turn! We want readers to send us your own book reviews for a kick-ass recommendation list that’ll have any bookworm cream her panties and dash to Barnes & Noble. Send {encode=”jessica@thefrisky.com” title=”jessica@thefrisky.com”} the title of a great book, the author, and two or three sentences about what makes the book so fab. We’ll post all the book reviews next week … and probably get nothing else accomplished because we’ll be reading. Keep reading »

Win This! “Us: Americans Talk About Love”

When you pick up a book about “love,” you shouldn’t expect anything. Love is one of those things that’s hard to describe and even harder to understand. We can’t really know what love is until we’re in it, and the love between two people is unique, so even if you’ve been in love, you’ll never understand another couple’s relationship. When I read Us: Americans Talk About Love, edited by social anthropologist John Bowe (published Jan. 5), I mistakenly thought that I’d be reading true love story after true love story, 300+ pages of happy endings. But Us isn’t about love stories; it is personalized experiences with love: all the highs and lows, messiness and simplicity. And talking about love probably turned out better stories. Seriously, I read through this in, like, two days over the Christmas vacation. Keep reading »

Real Chick Lit: The 30-Day Heartbreak Cure

Sooner or later, everybody falls in love. When it’s good, it’s freaking amazing: birds sing, the sun shines, your Mom doesn’t annoy you so much and your checks are perpetually rosy, When it doesn’t work out, however, it burns like the fiery pits of hell. All that was good with the world has been obliterated – along with your self-esteem. And the way you’ll likely add insult to injury be inflicting even more torture upon yourself – well, that’s not so pretty either. Either you can’t eat or you’re eating pint after pint of Ben & Jerry’s, you’re sleeping all day or not sleeping at all or you’ve either abandoned all personal grooming habits or, in a particularly “screw-it” moment, went and got a majorly unflattering short haircut [Or a totally flattering one! -- Editor] or tattoo. As a post-dumpage Lloyd Dobler was labeled by his buddies outside the Gas ‘n Sip in “Say Anything”, you’re null and void. Keep reading »

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