Tag Archives: art

Photoshopped Versions Of Famous Paintings Are Kind Of Terrifying

What would Botticelli’s Birth of Venus look like if the star of the painting had been airbrushed? If famous works of art had been created today, they might have a whole different look.

Lauren Wade, photo editor at TakePart, used GIFs to alter the body sizes of some of history’s most beautiful portrayals of the female body to fit today’s beauty standards, and the results are pretty appalling. We’ve all seen the photos and videos of just how dramatic the effects of Photoshop are, but for some reason, watching these paintings transform feels so much more jarring. The full collection can be seen here. Maybe Vogue and Glamour should take a look at them too and take a cue from the original paintings – softer bodies are just as beautiful as today’s supermodels! [TakePart]

Thanks, I Made It Myself: DIY Wall Art For Non-Artists

As much as my inner Montessori teacher wants to be like, “We are all artists!”, I know that many people feel much more comfortable around an angry skunk than a paintbrush. But! Lack of artistic experience or natural aptitude shouldn’t keep you from creating some fabulous DIY art for your home. Click through for some seriously easy DIY art ideas, guaranteed to add some interest to your walls and some unabashed pride to your voice when you say, “Why thank you, I made it myself!”

Kudos To This Portrait Series For Not Erasing LGBTQ Identities While Proving They’re Just Like You

Self-Evident-Truths-Project

The Self Evident Truths Project is an ambitious undertaking to photograph portraits of 10,000 people who identify as being anywhere on the LGBTQI spectrum, or anyone who isn’t “100% straight.” According to the project’s creator iO Tillett Wright, the point of the project is to “humanize a vast community” through these portraits, with the ultimate goal being to print out each portrait and display it on the National Mall in 2016, immediately preceding the next presidential election. Read more on The Gloss…

14 Cool Foreign Words With No Direct English Translation, As Illustrated By Designer Anjana Iyer

“Sure, you can borrow that Junot Diaz book. It’s in the tsundoku pile on my desk.”

As a writer, I’m totally fascinated and obsessed with language, including the absence of specific words from the English language that match fairly common experiences. Like, for example: I have a growing stack of books that I buy and then don’t read — at least not for awhile. When I walk into a bookstore, I just can’t seem to help myself and I know I’m not alone — so why isn’t there a word to describe this impulse?

Well, turns out there is — in Japanese. Tsundoku is defined as “the act of leaving a book unread after buying it, typically piling it up together with other such unread books.” And here is how tsundoku is visually explained by designer Anjana Iyer, who’s embarked on a 100 day project to visually explain untranslatable words from non-English languages. Iver is on Day 41 of the “Found In Translation” series and I am obsessed. So many words I’ve been dying to learn — just in other languages.

Here are 14 of my favorite words that Iver has illustrated so far, along with how you might go about integrating them into your English vocabulary. (And be sure to keep an eye on Iver’s website for a new word and illustration every day!) [100 Days Project]

Life Dream Status: 1,600 Papier-Maché Pandas

No, Jessica, you’re not dreaming. What you’re looking at are 1,600 papier-maché pandas meant to symbolize the remaining great bears still alive in the world. Inspired by the World Wildlife Fund, whose symbol is a panda, the 1,600 bears are a project by the French artist Paolo Grangeon. Featuring both adult pandas and babies, they’ve traveled to 20 countries over the past six years. The next installation will be in Hong Kong, where i09 reports that Grangeon will leave behind four additional pandas permanently. I should probably never see this public art installation because I will get arrested for trying to steal all of them. [Papier-Mache.co.uki09]

Small Town Confuses Unity Sculpture For Giant Orgy

Small Town Confuses Unity Sculpture For Giant Orgy

Art is often, if not always, open to interpretation, but sometimes those interpretations can be wildly off base from the artist’s original intent. Such is the case with Mark Chatterley’s “Blue Human Condition” sculpture, which was unveiled in Adrian, Michigan, last week as part of the city’s public art program. The sculpture, which was originally positioned near the town’s City Hall, features seven figures in various seated, standing and crouching positions, leaning against or sitting on each other. Chatterley told The Huffington Post the piece — which was selected and borrowed by the city — represents the idea that “living today, we can’t do it alone — we rely on other people … to try to survive.” Unfortunately, some Adrian residents didn’t see what Chatterly saw in his figures, and complained to city officials that the sculpture is ”disgusting” and an “abomination” — because they think it depicts an orgy. Keep reading »

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