Tag Archives: anorexia

Teen Maps Her Recovery From Anorexia Over Instagram

todays lady news
  • Antonia Eriksson isn’t like most 18-year-olds on Instagram. She’s got the selfies and the food porn, but for her, Instagram is something different: it’s about charting her path to recovery from an eating disorder. Her account used to be entitled @fightinganorexia and began in September 2012, when she was hospitalized near death. Her very first picture was from a hospital bed. Now she posts photographs of healthy foods and of her stronger, healthier body after workouts. [The Daily Dot, Instagram.com/EatMoveImprove] Keep reading »

Study: Anorexia Is Similar To Autism

My Eating Disorder
Katie struggled for an eating disorder in high school and college. Read More »
Dating Man With Autism
Dating a man with autism taught me to be myself. Read More »
Exploiting Anorexia
Tracey Gold photo
Will a new reality TV show exploit women with eating disorders? Read More »
Karl On Anorexia
He thinks the fashion industry has nothing to do with it. Read More »
anorexia and autism

A new study suggests that girls suffering from anorexia display similar personality traits to those with autism, such as lack of empathy, high focus on detail, and rigid behavior. In some instances, girls with anorexia scored five times higher in autistic qualities than non-anorexic girls on the Autism Spectrum Quotient. Keep reading »

Taboo Addictions: 5 Adult Eating Disorders That Go Beyond Anorexia & Bulimia

Eating disorders are often times associated with specific races, age groups, and even career choices…think white teenage actress/models. But the truth is that eating disorders do not discriminate. According to the National Eating Disorder Association, 10 million American women suffer from eating disorders. This is not a Black v. White epidemic, and it certainly does not only apply to those experiencing puberty. When the University of North Carolina’s Eating Disorders Program was initially designed in 2003 they expected most of their patients to be adolescents, however today they report that 50 percent of their patients are over 30-years-old. Read more on Hello Beautiful…

Attention, Models: Cotton Balls Are Not For Eating

Plus-Size Models
plus-size models on vogue italia
Vogue Italia features three plus-size cover models. Read More »
"Girl Model" Documentary
This movie pulls back the curtain on underage modeling. Read More »
My Eating Disorder
Katie struggled for an eating disorder in high school and college. Read More »

Eddie Murphy’s genetically gifted daughter Bria Murphy is now a model and recently revealed some  … questionable … eating habits of her peers. Said Murphy in an interview:

“I’ve heard of people eating the cotton balls with the orange juice … they dip it in the orange juice and then they eat the cotton balls to help them feel full, because the cotton’s not doing anything.  It’s just dissolving.  And it makes you think you’re full, but you’re not.” Keep reading »

Absolutely Terrible: Modeling Agencies Are Stalking Eating Disorder Clinics For New Models Now

My Eating Disorder
Katie struggled for an eating disorder in high school and college. Read More »
Exploiting Anorexia
Tracey Gold photo
Will a new reality TV show exploit women with eating disorders? Read More »
Too Young Models?
Is the problem with too-thin model or too-young girls? Read More »

Because skinny is more important than healthy, some modeling scouts in Sweden have taken to hanging around outside of eating disorder clinics to find new models. Yes, I’ll say that again: modeling scouts are approaching girls — some of them too weak to stand — at the Stockholm Center for Eating Disorders and offering them modeling contracts. Dr. Anna-Maria af Sandeberg, who helps run the clinic, said the scouts are “repugnant” and send the “wrong signals when the girls are being treated for eating disorders.” Keep reading »

Alexa Chung On Body Image & How Naturally Thin Girls Can’t Win Either

Gaga's Body Revolution
Gaga starts an important conversation about body image. Read More »
Fat News Anchor
Wisconsin news anchor responds to fat shamer's bullying letter. Read More »
Open Letter
Winona pens an open letter to the fat girl. Read More »
Ugly Duckling Lessons
Life lessons from a former ugly duckling. Read More »

“I think it’s about time people stopped judging women on their appearance and more on their intellect. Like you can appreciate my style without having to appreciate my weight. It’s not actually mutually inclusive. I just get frustrated because, just because I exist in this shape, doesn’t mean that I’m like advocating it and being like, ‘I look great.’ How do you know I’m not looking in the mirror and going ‘I wish I could gain ten pounds?’ Which is actually quite often the case. But if you say that you sound like you’re bragging that you’re naturally thin, and you’re not allowed to do that because even though it’s not the ideal weight, it kind of is as well. So it’s really fucked up. And how people that are bigger can be on the front covers of magazines being like ‘I’m really happy with my shape.’ But if I was to do that, I’d be compeltely criticized and ridiculed. But why can’t I be happy with how I look? …  I’m just a bit sick of it. I just think that whole culture of hatred, and also feeling like it’s your right to judge people when you don’t know them is really fucked up.”

– This is Alexa Chung talking to Fashionista about the controversy that erupted awhile back when she posted a picture of herself looking quite thin on Instagram. Chung was derided by commenters on the site for being “thinspiration” for women with eating disorders. The whole interview is quite good and I recommend you read the entire thing. She says some very smart things about how naturally thin and skinny women are not immune to body scrutiny and, while it doesn’t compare equally to larger-sized women, it’s still body-policing. As a naturally skinny person, Chung is on the receiving end of insinuations and comments that she must have an eating disorder. Larger women can’t win and skinnier women can’t win, either. Alexa is right: it’s time we stopped judging all women on their appearance.  [Fashionista]

Karl Lagerfeld Says It’s “Ridiculous” To Suggest Anorexic Girls In Fashion Industry Are A Problem

Too Young Models?
Is the problem with too-thin model too-young girls? Read More »
Model Age Limit
Models under 16 won't be allowed to walk in fashion shows. Read More »
Karl's "Fat" Comment
Adele is "a little too fat," according to designer Karl Lagerfeld. Read More »

“I’m sorry to say that it’s a subject I consider ridiculous for several reasons; the story with the anorexic girls — nobody works with anorexic girls, that’s nothing to do with fashion. People who have that [anorexia] have problems to do with family and things like that. … There are less than 1 per cent of anorexic girls, but there more than 30 percent of girls in France — I don’t know about England — that are much, much overweight. And it is much more dangerous and very bad for the health … So I think today with the junk food in front of the TV it’s something dangerous for the health of the girl.”

Here’s the thing with Karl Lagerfeld‘s denial-is-not-just-a-river-in-Egypt comments on Britain’s Channel 4 News. He’s right that anorexia is a mental illness which cannot be attributed to just one factor. He’s also correct that unhealthy eating is also bad. And he’s even got a point, sort of, about the fashion industry not wanting to work with anorexic “girls.” The fashion industry isn’t necessarily employing “normal-sized” women who are anorexic; they are employing women who are rail-thin with androgynous, boyish frames as well as young teen/tween girls whose bodies are practically prepubescent. There is a reason why there has been a huge controversy with the CFDA regarding designers who employ models under the age of 16. So, in a sense, Lagerfeld does have a valid point that can be teased out of this quote. But his snotty comments about Adele being “fat” and overall dismissiveness/lack of responsibility towards eating disorders in his industry is enraging. Choupette, I’ll always love, but I am officially done with Karl Lagerfeld. [Telegraph UK]

12 Celebs Who Battled Eating Disorders

Katie Couric revealed last week that she struggled with bulimia in her early 20s—and sadly, she’s far from the only celebrity to have battled an eating disorder. The Huffington Post rounds up a dozen:

  • Jessica Alba: She once said that she had trouble adjusting to “a woman’s body with natural fat in places.” “I freaked out,” she said, and her obsession turned into an eating disorder.
  • Katharine McPhee: The American Idol and Smash star revealed that she struggled with bulimia for five years—and that it almost destroyed her vocal chords. Read more…

The Soapbox: In Response To Lady Gaga And Her Proposed “Body Revolution”

Gaga On The Pope
She says his view on homosexuality doesn't matter. Read More »
Lady Gaga/Leigh Bowery
The singer learned everything she knows from Leigh Bowery. Read More »

I have vilified Lady Gaga in the past (to much condemnation, given her rabid fanbase): the contrived, weird-for-attention shtick really wears on me, particularly considering it comes hand-in-hand with what basically amounts to catchy, radio-friendly pop music with a pseudo-controversial religious message here and there. I can live with her message of peace, love, and acceptance, but that isn’t enough to make a fan out of me. Here’s what is: in defense of her recent 25-pound weight gain and the ensuing media scrutiny, Gaga gets naked, or at least stripped to her skivvies, to set the “Body Revolution” in motion. Keep reading »

Girl Talk: I Had An Eating Disorder

Exploiting Anorexia
Tracey Gold photo
Will a new reality TV show exploit women with eating disorders? Read More »
Free Therapy?
12 totally free ways to improve your mental health. Read More »
Find A Therapist
therapist photo
Seven tips for finding the right therapist. Read More »
How To Deal
Life is hard. Sometimes we all need help dealing. Read More »

This piece is part of The Frisky’s How To Deal Week, in which we’re tackling mental health issues.

A week before my high school graduation, my doctor told me that I had to go to the hospital.

My weight had fallen too low, my EKG results were scary, and my continued refusal to eat was putting my life in danger. While my classmates went to college orientation, I went to nutrition counseling and group therapy. For two years I had faithfully obeyed the voice in my head that told me that if I ate more than the acceptable amount of food (an amount that kept getting smaller and smaller), I would be weak, my body and the world would spin out of control, and something terrible would happen. And yet something terrible was happening anyway.

I was losing every bit of control over my life, and goals I had spent years working towards — a scholarship to an elite college, freedom from my family and small town — were slipping from my grasp. I realized there was something I feared even more than the voice in my head, and I started to fight back. I obeyed the nutritionist even when my mind told me it couldn’t possibly be okay to eat this much food. I started to gain weight. And in the fall I enrolled in college. Keep reading »

  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • Popular