Tag Archives: aging

Girl Talk: Anjelica Huston Is My Beauty Role Model

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You know how girls who are trying to lose weight tape pictures of sleek, gorgeous models to the fridge? I want a huge photo of Anjelica Huston, in “Smash,” on my wall, to remind me of what to aspire to.

Anjelica Huston is 60. And yeah, maybe she’s had some work done. And yeah, her hair is not its natural color. And yeah, she is wearing a lot of makeup. (Actually, that’s maybe my only complaint—all the makeup. I can tell that she’d be stunning without it.) But even with it, and the dyed hair, and the possible tweaking that seems inevitable for women over the age of 35 on television, she is still undeniably different. She is still strikingly unique. No one else looks even close to anything like her. And instead of letting this be a weakness, she makes it her signature. She makes it her strength. Instead of disappearing into the crowd, she stands at the middle of it and shouts until everyone turns to pay attention. And all eyes stay on her. Her look refuses to be typical. It refuses to be “appropriate.” And her character on “Smash” fits her look perfectly. She is Eileen Rand, a brash, determined producer who emerges from her wealthy, philandering ex-husband’s shadow to take the reins and put on a play that she thinks will sweep Broadway. Keep reading »

Age Ain’t Nothin’ But A Number: Women At Every Age

Wellllll okay. We don’t have women at every age, but we do have women from 20 to 41 — in an attempt to show the variety of ways that women age. I’ve always been terrible at guessing how old people really are, and I’m betting I’m not the only one. Twenty-five can look totally different on two people, depending on diet, skincare, heredity and sun exposure (hello, Lindsay Lohan), and so can 40. But whatever your age, I think it’s important not to take it too seriously — you’re only as old as you feel, after all.

Why I Got Botox In My 20′s

You know that muscle in the middle of your forehead, right between your brows? The scowling muscle? Maybe you don’t. Maybe some people are blissfully unaware of their weird, clenchy forehead muscle.

Mine has always been overactive.

As a teenager, I always had this deep cleft of worry and contempt etched between my brows, even when I wasn’t angry. Sometimes, the spot would actually hurt from overuse. In my early twenties, it became more pronounced. The middle of my forehead would ache, and I would rub my fingers over it in circles, trying to relax it. Read more on The Gloss…

“About Face” Asks Supermodels To Consider Aging

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Perhaps it’s models who feel the tyranny of aging more than anyone. At least that’s the hypothesis put forth by Timothy Greenfield-Sunders, maker of the new documentary “About Face,” which explores the ways that women who’ve made a living off of being beautiful feel about aging. Greenfield-Sunders interviews current and former models, including Jerry Hall, Isabella Rosselini and Paulina Porizkova, who notes, “Modeling doesn’t have anything to do with self-confidence. Working off your looks makes you the opposite of self-confident.” Continues Porizkova, “So maybe I became beautiful once I stopped modeling.” [YouTube]

W Magazine Ages Amber Valetta 120 Years

Models are typically considered ready to be shipped off to the model glue factory before they even hit 25, but in an editorial for the September issue of W magazine, 37-year-old model Amber Valetta was aged a remarkable 120 years. Shot by photographer Steven Klein, Valetta channeled the timelessness of an age-defying Madonna (it can’t be merely coincidence that the copy refers to our heroine as a “material girl”), and stays sultry and supple–even with more than a century’s worth of wear and tear on her. [Unbreakable Diamond] Keep reading »

11 Reasons I’ll Never Get Botox Again

I thought Botox would change my life. I admired the shiny, perfect foreheads of my elders on “The Real Housewives of Orange County” (or New York, New Jersey, D.C. and Miami, for that matter) and wished that I too could include myself in the natural-but-not club. I’m 28 and definitely the only one in my small-town Indiana family to even consider Botox. I thought it was a necessary form of torture–some sun damage from a few years back had left its mark in the form of noticeable (probably only to me?) horizontal lines across my forehead. It wasn’t quite as if someone drew on my face with eyeliner, but it bothered me. So with the help of a Lifebooker special for $179, I took the plunge before a trip to Jamaica where I intended to do a little more sun damage.

And here’s why I won’t ever do it again. Keep reading »

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