Saudi Woman Challenges Her Dad Over Male Guardianship Law

Imagine that you could not travel or go to school without your dad’s permission. You need him, your brother, or a male driver to take you anywhere you want to go in a car. He even has a say in who you get to marry.

This is life under Saudi Arabia‘s guardianship law — a combination of the legal code and religious doctrine within the kingdom. Men have guardianship over the unmarried women in their families, which usually means a father is guardian to his daughter (but in his absence, a son or uncle can fill in). When a woman marries, the guardianship switches over to her husband. Even when Saudi women are no longer minors, they are still treated like children in the eyes of the law.

One woman is trying to change all that: a 43-old-old doctor, going by the pseudonym “Samia” in press reports, is challenging her father’s guardianship in the Saudi Supreme Court. Keep reading »

Lily Allen Thinks American Celebs Aren’t Normal, Abuse Adderall

“I wasn’t eating … [I was] going out at night. I guess when you’re not eating you have to distract yourself with other things. Come three o’clock it was like, ‘Oh I suppose it’s acceptable to have a glass of wine.’ And then by four o’clock I would have had four glasses. It’s not the way to be. But then I met Sam and he noticed that behavior. I think it came to a point for him where he was thinking, ‘Can I be with this girl if this is what her life is like? I want to make this work, but I can’t live in this world.’ I just needed someone to tell me … I hang out with models, the biggest pop stars and, you know, really and honestly, I hate saying this, but none of them are achieving those body shapes by being healthy. They’re not just going to the gym two hours a day. They’re not eating or they’re taking speed not to eat. In America everyone abuses that Adderall stuff and people aren’t normal.’”

Lily Allen talks about getting healthy in Elle UK. While I appreciate Lily’s candor and her embracing of a new lifestyle, I think she’s going to get lambasted for this interview. It reeks of self-righteousness. I’m sure someone in the modeling/music industry will make some counter-statement about how they don’t use drugs or starve themselves to stay thin. Also, American celebrities aren’t normal and all abuse Adderall? Really? What? Is she trying really hard to be controversial or is it a case of not thinking before she speaks? [Celebitchy] Keep reading »

The Good, The Bad & The Meh Of Celebrity 4th Of July Weekend Style

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Celebrities were out in full-force during the 4th of July weekend. A few showed their patriotism with red, white, and blue fashions. But others took a decidedly more laid-back approach with their holiday weekend style. Keep clicking to see the good, the bad, and the meh of celebrity 4th of July style.

Woman Claims She Was “Driven Out” Of Harrod’s Job For Not Wearing Makeup

A 24-year-old sales clerk at Harrod’s resigned two weeks ago because she claims the famous London department store was trying to force her to wear makeup. Melanie Stark has been employed at Harrod’s for five years, during which she never wore makeup. She even claims she didn’t wear makeup on her job interview at age 19. Then senior managers came for a visit last August, spied her sans fards, and sent her home. Since then, management hauled Stark in for repeated meetings and PowerPoint presentations about the importance of following the Harrod’s dress code, which she received upon employment:

“Full makeup at all time: base, blusher, full eyes (not too heavy), lipstick, lip liner and gloss are worn at all time and maintained discreetly (please take into account the store display lighting which has a ‘washing out’ effect).”

Eventually Stark was told she could “just wear eyeliner and lipstick” to be in compliance. Instead, she chose to quit. Keep reading »

Style By Jury: Do You Like Evan Rachel Wood’s New Pixie Cut?

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The Dos And Don’ts Of Working As A Woman In The Music Industry

This article originally appeared at Thought Catalog. You should follow Thought Catalog on Twitter here.

Ladies: if for some nutty reason, you decide you want to be challenged, ridiculed, unfairly judged and, of course, stereotyped in your career, the music industry is just the thing for you!

Don’t get me wrong. I’ve worked in both booking and label environments, and I’m not going anywhere. But the business is so conspicuously male that, at times, I catch my left eye twitching in the mirror. It’s weird that, even today, I feel like I have to ask, “Where, exactly, do we girls fit in?” Here’s why.

As a female, once you tell somebody that you work in the industry, it’s as if they automatically think one of two things: “whore” or “bitch.” Thanks to movies like “Almost Famous,” websites like isanyoneup.com, and Pamela Des Barres’ tell-all book, I’m with the Band: Confessions of a Groupie, we women appear to have firmly cemented our place in music as sex dolls. On the other side of the scale, flicks such as “The Devil Wears Prada” depict females in positions of power as being uptight, chaste bitches — and this feeds fire to the flame.

So here are some friendly reminders for my fellow women who wish to follow their dreams, without falling into either of the above mentioned categories. Keep reading »

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