Category Archives: health

Catch up on the latest health legislation, honest discussions about our bodies, and “I Have” essays from women’s personal experiences. Whether mental or physical The Frisky discusses each disease, concern, or condition to encourage open conversation.

I Have Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

It can be something as little as the time I was standing in a hotel parking lot while on vacation one summer, and out of the corner of my eye, I saw a man walking toward me. He looked exactly like my father. The closer he got, the larger the lump in my throat became. Or, it can be something a little bigger, like the few dozen times I’ve walked past the building on the campus of Northern Illinois University where my father worked and pictured him galloping up the stairs with a huge smile on his face. Or, even the time when I found the blue-knit cap he wore during the course of his chemotherapy and radiation to treat an aggressive form of sinus cancer and up until the day he committed suicide two weeks after finishing treatment. Or, the smell of his clothes and how they’d remind me of his big bear hugs.

That’s Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in a nutshell. It’s the body’s way of trying to process the massive stockpile of emotions left in the wake of a traumatic life event. Keep reading »

Got Varicose Veins? There May Be Hope Yet …

Oh, those Europeans with their progressive societies ripe with universal health care, affordable education, hardly enforced drinking ages … and niche prescription meds unavailable elsewhere. Well, at least one European medical import is about to make its way Stateside. The FDA has just approved a medication called Asclera, used to treat varicose veins. Considered to be very safe and the best treatment out there, the injectable drug was apparently being used sneakily by some in the U.S., reports the Times: ” … polidocanol [clinical name], had not been legal, although some doctors used it, importing it from abroad or obtaining it from pharmacies that make drug compounds.”

Now that Asclera has been made legal here, it may be a good thing to keep in mind should the day ever arrive when varicose veins start blooming. (Let’s hope that’s not the case.) What we’d like to know is are the Europeans using some secret treatment for cellulite? Because that’s something we’d definitely be interested in hearing about next … cough, cough. [NY Times] Keep reading »

A Bad Marriage May Have Serious Effects On Your Health

As a single lady who is fairly skeptical about marriage, I found this NY Times Magazine article very enlightening. The long-standing theory is that there are major health benefits for the marrieds of the world—they tend to live longer, healthier lives. But new research is showing that this “marriage benefit” does not extend to those that are unhappily married, divorced, or widowed. It seems to be more about the quality of the relationship than having the relationship itself. I hate to say it—duh! Who feels good in an unhealthy relationship? No one.

After the jump, what some scientific studies have shown about marriage and health. Keep reading »

Children With A Rare Syndrome Don’t See Color

Children with Williams syndrome are truly “color blind.” This rare genetic disorder affects the brain and other organs, causing hyper-social activity and unlike most children older than three, these kids don’t show a preference for their own race. According to a new study, children with Williams syndrome have no concept of social anxiety and view blacks, whites, Hispanics, etc. in an equally positive light. While lacking these negative traits might seem positive, children and adults with Williams syndrome are at a greater risk for physical violence and rape because they can’t process social danger signals. I guess everything is a double-edged sword, huh? [NY Daily News] Keep reading »

Common Acne Drug Keeps HIV Dormant

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have found that minocycline, an antibiotic used to treat acne since the 1970s, can be used as an added defense against HIV. The drug targets immune cells in which the virus remains dormant and prevents them from replicating and reactivating. Minocycline, according to the researchers, is a great weapon in keeping HIV dormant because the virus appears less capable of developing a drug resistance to minocycline, unlike HAART (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy) medications. The antibiotic goes after T-cells, which are “major immune system agents and targets of HIV infection,” and decreases the ability for the T-cells to multiply and activate, whereas HAART attacks the virus. However, the researchers say that minocycline will have to be used in conjunction with HAART drug cocktails in order to keep HIV dormant. [Science Daily] Keep reading »

10 Ways The Passage Of The Health Care Reform Bill Will Affect Women

Why is Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi smiling from ear to ear in this pic? Because last night, she and Barack Obama managed to usher through the passage of the health care reform bill that’s been vehemently debated for, oh, months. This morning, it has lots of us talking about what exactly the bill will mean for women. The phrases “bad for women” and “good for women” are not my favorite, because we don’t actually all share one brain and think the same thing. So rather than declare anything good, bad, or eh—I’ll just explain and let you guys battle it out in the comments. After the jump, 10 ways the new health care bill will affect ladyfolk like us.
Keep reading »

  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • Popular