Tag Archives: feminism

The Great Craigslist Butt Revenge Adventure: What An Interaction With An Internet Rando Taught Me About My Ability To Ever Really Be “One Of The Guys”

Robyn pointed me toward this ad on Craigslist today:

Robyn, not knowing me that well yet, of course probably figured that I would not reply to this ad. But of course I replied to this ad. I had three reasons for doing so:

  1. Images of my butt are available on various parts of the Internet and in various contexts, so obviously I’m willing to negotiate the possibility of a stranger having a picture of my butt. If anyone should test whether or not this person is legitimately trying to get back at their employer, or if it’s just that he really likes butts, it should be me — any butt photo of mine that he would receive does not contain information that literally hundreds of thousands of other people don’t already have. Keep reading »

Revlon CEO: “I Can Smell Black People When They Enter A Room”

todays lady news
  • According to a lawsuit, Revlon’s CEO claimed that he could “smell Black people when they enter a room.” [The Grio]
  • The investigation into the Cleveland police shooting and death of 12-year-old Tamir Rice could be taken over by an outside agency. [RawStory]
  • Uber has given their customers some really half-assed safety tips following a string of reported driver sexual assaults. [Jezebel] Keep reading »

Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting Isn’t A Feminist Except For The Fact That She’s Living An Ideal Feminist Life, But Whatever

Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting (of “The Big Bang Theory”) told Redbook that she’s not a feminist, which is fine. I really don’t care whether or not a celebrity or anyone else identifies as a feminist, so long as they don’t object at their core to the existence of feminists or feminism and dedicate their lives to making sure that women stay in our place, or whatever.

That being said, here are the things in Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting’s Redbook interview that are making me facepalm a little bit:

  • “She loves taking care of her man—and she’s not ashamed to admit it.” Awesome! Feminism is totally fine with women falling into whatever roles they want to have, even if that’s super-conventional gender roles. The point is that women should have the choice to be whatever we want to be, as should men, and everyone, really. Previously, women really didn’t have a choice, and we still face barriers to opportunity that men don’t. Keep reading »

My New Year’s Resolution: Choose Oultrage Over Outrage

I find it edifying to look up the definitions and etymology of words that represent abstractions. Today it’s “outrage.” It’s being talked about a lot, not least of all because of Slate’s recent collection of articles on the subject, specifically how it has been proliferated by social media.

The English definition for “outrage” is “an extremely strong reaction of anger, shock, or indignation” or “an action or event causing anger, shock, or indignation.” It originated from the French word “oultrage,” which has a subtly different meaning: “a wantonly vicious or cruel act; a gross violation of decency, morality, honour, etc.; or profound indignation, anger, or hurt, caused by such an act.” Keep reading »

2014: The Year In Jenna Marbles Being Weird

Jenna Marbles is one of my greatest pleasures. My thoughts on Jenna Marbles are almost unequivocally positive. I started watching her channel when she posted “Some Idiot/How Sports Bras Work” about Yuksul Aytug’s truly idiotic comments about female Olympians and have watched every single main-channel video since then. Jenna Marbles is basically the highlight of my mid-week.

And I get that she says stuff that doesn’t seem particularly enlightened to leftists and feminists and people who are invested in social justice. She got reamed after making a video called “Things I Don’t Understand About Sluts,” and I totally agree with the objections to that video, but I don’t know. At the same time, I find it tremendously condescending when the feminist movement (as much as that’s a thing) singles out a woman for “internalized misogyny” and decides to tell her what she should be thinking, if she would just enlighten herself and get on their level. The same thing happened this week with Beyoncé’s 2014 retrospective video “Yours and Mine,” because she said that men and women balance each other out, and defined herself as a feminist and humanist in a way that many feminists and humanists believe is naïve (at best, and ignorant at worst). It’s a demand for female public figures to be perfect feminists — as majority feminism would have them be — straight out of the gate, and it gives no slack, leaves no room for growth, and turns women who are powerful, outspoken, self-possessed, and confident away from feminism. Just look at Amanda Palmer, who just last month decried a “radical, violent brand of feminism” that, let’s be honest, a lot of feminists who consider themselves (OK, ourselves) “moderate” have engaged in, in some capacity. Keep reading »

Jennifer Aniston: Feminism Is Not Complicated

“…people overcomplicate it. It’s simply believing in equality between men and women”

In the January issue of AllureJennifer Aniston sums up feminism in just one sentence. If we reminded ourselves more often that the movement’s bottom line is simply about equality, we’d all save ourselves a lot of grief. Aniston posed in a gorgeous topless shot alongside old friend Chris McMillan (the genius behind “The Rachel” haircut), and had a lot to tell the magazine about her right to simply be herself. She’s sick of the unfair pressure placed on women to have children and society’s silly tendency to fawn all over actresses when they choose to play an “ugly” character. [Image via Michael Thompson/Allure]

Keep reading »

  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • Popular