Tag Archives: feminism

Today’s Lady News: Remembering Christina Green, 9, Victim Of Tucson Shooting

  • A remembrance of Tucson, Arizona shooting victim, nine-year-old Christina Green, who had recently won a seat on her student council and just wanted to meet her local politician, Gabrielle Giffords. (Randomly, Christina is the cousin of “One Tree Hill” actress Sophia Bush.) [Ms. Magazine]
  • Miss England beauty queen Katrina Hodge is deploying for her second tour in Afghanistan. [Styleite]
  • The abortion rate has stalled after 30 years in decline, according to a new study by the Guttmacher Institute, which collects data on reproductive rights. Also, drug-induced (i.e., medical) abortions with RU-486 are on the rise. [Reuters]

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Rosario Dawson Blasts Looks-Obsessed Hollywood

“My whole job is mostly about feeling like I am discriminated against because I am a woman. It is completely OK to [discriminate] outright and out loud — it is wild, but I deal with it. I feel like being an actress, being told to lose weight and be younger — it’s crazy, but it is part and parcel of the game. To say that looks or age or sex doesn’t matter is ridiculous. But I feel lucky in that every single woman pretty much on the planet has to deal with that sense of how she looks, portrays herself, and this and that. We are scrutinized and compared and all of that kind of stuff. That is kind of what it is to be a woman, unfortunately, still to this day. Even with the coups of feminism we are still there. But at least every other woman is going through that. It’s not something extra special that I have to go through. It is just part of my job.”

— “Unstoppable” actress Rosario Dawson on Hollywood holding women like her under a microscope. While it’s true that it’s an image-conscious business for all actors and actresses, it’s no secret that the pressure is especially intense for women. [Daily Telegraph] Keep reading »

Men’s Studies Vs. Male Studies: What’s The Difference?

I took gender and sexuality studies as a minor in college, which is what my school offered instead of “women’s studies.” I assumed at first that they were just being PC with the name. But then when I took the first class, an introduction to the discipline, I realized it truly wasn’t just about women. We learned about constructs like gender and sexuality, yes, but we also devoted a lot of attention to the intersectionality of race, class, religion and able-bodiedness. That introductory instructor encouraged us not to assume gender was what individuals identified with first and cautioned us against ignoring other ways people are oppressed by focusing solely on gender. Gender studies was actually the hip new term for the discipline; “women’s studies,” on the other hand, sounded hopelessly old-school. I took four gender and sexuality studies classes and only one — “Women and The Media” — focused on women almost exclusively (that class was about media depictions). The other courses, however, were far more intersectional and examined all the different ways people can be oppressed; for example, “The History of Prostitution” talked a lot about how female sex workers flourished during Victorian times in part because men felt they had no other outlet.

I never took a “men’s studies” class that focused primarily on men. But if I could go back in time, I might have majored in G&SS instead of minored and taken a course strictly about masculinity. After all, gender is so intersectional and I do want to learn more about that particular construct. Approximately, 100 colleges around the country offer “men’s studies” courses — one would assume in the gender studies, sociology or anthropology departments — and though it’s not offered as a major anywhere yet, the proliferation of these courses is a good sign that in the coming years, masculinity will be critiqued and evaluated just as much as femininity has been by “women’s studies.”

So if G&SS is now incorporating the study of women’s and men’s experiences together, then what the heck is “male studies” about? Keep reading »

Today’s Lady News: Are “Chinese Mothers” Superior?

  • The Wall Street Journal ran a controversial op-ed by Yale Law professor Amy Chua about “Chinese mothers,” or more broadly, a sub-set of strict parents who expect excellence from their children and force them to both study and rehearse instruments for hours a day. “Chinese parents can get away with things that Western parents can’t. Once when I was young — maybe more than once — when I was extremely disrespectful to my mother, my father angrily called me ‘garbage’ in our native Hokkien dialect. It worked really well. I felt terrible and deeply ashamed of what I had done. But it didn’t damage my self-esteem or anything like that.” She continues to explain her own parenting style with her two young daughters. It’s though-provoking, to say the least. [Wall Street Journal]
  • A former investment banker told BusinessWeek all about his mail-order bride business called Hand-In-Hand which “pairs” women from Eastern European countries with American men. These ladies are “unspoiled by feminism,” said Joseph Weiner. “You take a beautiful woman from the Czech Republic and you bring her into your home, she does all your cooking and cleaning and ironing.” [NYmag.com]

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Salon Ends Broadsheet Blog, Announces Tracy Clark-Flory’s New Role

For many Frisky staffers, and Frisky readers, we’re sure, Salon’s Broadsheet blog is a daily must-read. A so-called “feminist” blog, Broadsheet has always been more than that — a blog about politics, sex, and cultural trends that just so happens to look at those subjects through the female lens. Now, Salon has announced Broadsheet will be no more. Which is sad. But we’re thrilled to hear that one of our favorite lady writers, Tracy Clark-Flory, who has been at the helm of Broadsheet for the last year, will still be writing for Salon but focusing on long-form original reporting on sex, relationships, and, we’d imagine, feminism. We’re looking forward to more of her insightful, thoughtful, and balanced work that never ceases to make us think. BTW, if you’d like to share your earliest sex memories with Tracy for an upcoming story, she’s looking for interviewees. [Salon] Keep reading »

Roseanne Barr Is Depressed By Feminism, “Ignorant Women In This Country”

ParentDish: Does feminism today depress you?

Roseanne Barr: Yeah incredibly so, until you actually meet a real Roseanne Barr might be just a wee out of touch about feminism/feminists these days, but I nevertheless find her crankiness delightful. (Later in the interview she called ex-husband Tom Arnold “one of the symptoms of me being a crazy person” – ouch!) [Parent Dish] Keep reading »

Today’s Lady News: Doctor Recounts What Abortion Was Like Before Roe V. Wade

  • Dr. Waldo Fielding writes about the horrifying complications faced by many women before Roe v. Wade made abortion legal. [NY Times]
  • Need a pick-me-up? Check out That’s What She Said, a blog featuring tons of amazing quotes from women like Maya Angelou, Ursula LeGuin, and Kathleen Hanna. [That's What She Said]
  • Nancy Pelosi’s reign as Speaker of the House may be over, but the impact of her history-making appointment shouldn’t be forgotten. [Ms.]
  • Remember the fuss made a few years ago over those photos of a then-underage Miley Cyrus in Vanity Fair? One woman wonders why there isn’t similar controversy surrounding Justin Bieber’s VF cover, in which the teenage singer is covered in red lipstick kisses. [Evil Slutophia]

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Today’s Lady News: The Regrets Of A Stay-At-Home Mom

  • These are the regrets of a stay-at-home mom who “opted out” of the workforce, got divorced, and is now broke. For anyone who would eventually like to stay at home and raise some babies, this is a must-read. [Salon.com]
  • Beth Ditto of The Gossip is writing a memoir! Yay! [Vogue IT]
  • A Kentucky Senate committee OK’d a bill that would require a woman to view an ultrasound of her fetus before having an abortion. They call it “informed consent”; I call it somewhat cruel, depending on the circumstances. [Courier-Journal.com]
  • Sorta-feminist Naomi Wolf now has a (fake) Twitter account. [Twitter]

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Now This Is A Hand Gun

From artist Joseph Barbaccia’s Integration series: BLAMe. Not quite sure what that title means, but I like the idea here. Feeling a little vulnerable? Wish you were better armed? Well, have a handgun transplanted onto your hand, and you are a post-feminist Terminator. One question, though. When the bullet exists the forefinger, will it mess up my manicure? [Joseph Barbaccia] Keep reading »

Today’s Lady News: Naomi Wolf Says Sex-Crime Accusers Deserve To Be Named

  • Naomi Wolf (author of, among other things, The Beauty Myth) has really taken her Julian Assange defense to a whole new level. In an op-ed for the U.K.’s Guardian newspaper, Wolf says that not only should the women accusing Assange of rape be named in the press, but rape accusers in general shouldn’t be granted anonymity. She says that the practice of “shielding rape accusers is a relic of the Victorian era” and that “the outcomes harm women.” [Guardian U.K.]
  • ESPN has fired Ron Franklin, the announcer who berated a female colleague and called her “sweet baby” and an “a-hole.” [ESPN]
  • Nancy Pelosi handed over her gavel to new Speaker of the House John Boehner, who was officially elected today. [Huffington Post]

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