Tag Archives: feminism

Cutesy Pink Infographic Patronizes Women In Tech (Yet Again)

Click here to see full image.

“Infographics” are the big buzzwords on blogs. They’re funny! They’re brightly colored! They go viral! Even when they go viral for the wrong reasons ’cause they’re sexist and offensive! Yesterday, an infographic called “Which Female Tech Influencer Are You?” from something called WPromote hit the web. Following the chart and answering questions like, “Which hairstyle do you prefer?”, “White wine or tequila with worm?” and “Who is your dream man?” you find out which well-known woman in tech you most resemble. Your options are Marissa Mayer, Google VP; Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook; Natalie Messenet, founder of Net-A-Porter; Caroline McCarthy, tech writer for CNet,com; and Sarah Evans, a PR pro.

Something tells me the COO of Facebook and a VP at Google have more on their mind than their “dream man” or their favorite type of footwear. Keep reading »

Today’s Lady News: Watch Out, Reproductive Rights

  • Republicans’ plans for health care reform include doing whatever it takes to restrict abortion rights. Gird your loins, ladies! [The Hill]
  • Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman called pundit Arianna Huffington “sweetheart” on “Morning Joe,” as the two bickered about WMDs and Iraq. [Jezebel]
  • A national anti-abortion group, Americans United for Life, has announced that Oklahoma is #1 among states for legislative restrictions on abortion. Um, congratulations? [NewsOK.com]

Keep reading »

Today’s Lady News: Bill O’Reilly Sees No Media “Gender Bias” Against Sarah Palin

  • Bill O’Reilly said on “The O’Reilly Factor” last Thursday that he did not see any gender bias in the media’s coverage of former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin and Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann. Palin herself has said the media’s treatment of her has been sexist at times. You know, this actually makes me feel a little bad for these two women: it must suck to have a man from your side of the aisle be dismissive of the B.S. you go through. [Daily Caller]
  • Rep. Gabrielle Giffords may be out of the hospital on Friday, her husband has said. Her next stop will be a rehabilitation center in Texas to overcome injuries from the gunshot wound to the head she sustained during the mass shooting in Tucson, Arizona, two weeks ago. We wish her a swift recovery. [MSNBC]
  • George Bronk, 23, of California, has plead guilty to breaking into 3,200 women’s email accounts and searching for nude photos of them, which he then posted to the Internet. Bronk allegedly read Facebook profiles looking for answers to Yahoo’s standard security questions. He was able to find nude or semi-nude photos from 172 women. Creeps: they walk among us. [PC World]

Keep reading »

Today’s Lady News: High School Finds List “Ranking” 50 Girls

  • A list ranking 50 female students and their body parts at Oak Park River Forest High School in Oak Park, Illinois, has been intercepted by administrators. The list also refers to the girls with racial slurs. [WGNTV]
  • A Kentucky court has ruled that minors from other states can ask KY judges for permission to have an abortion without notifying or asking for consent from their parents. [Cincinnati.com]
  • The first-ever gay/lesbian/bisexual/trans museum has opened in San Francisco’s Castro district, as part of the city’s GLBT Historical Society. [Nerve]

Keep reading »

This Two-Tongued Lady Is Bilingual

Ack! Copyranter says this poster for a Berlitz language school in Rome was spotted in the Italian subway system. Apparently, the idea is that a woman who is bilingual speaks with two tongues — in this case, literally. We suspect this freaky vision is going to give some men certain ideas. Let’s hope second-tongue transplants aren’t the plastic surgery procedure of the future. [Copyranter] Keep reading »

Today’s Lady News: Idaho Pharmacist Refuses Medication For Woman Who Had Abortion

  • A pharmacist in Nampa, Idaho, refused to fill a prescription for anti-bleeding medication for a woman, telling her she would not give it if it was being used after an abortion. Planned Parenthood of the Greater Northwest said the woman needed Methergine, which is used to stop bleeding after an abortion or childbirth. Idaho passed a so-called “conscience clause” law which allows pharmacists to refuse to dispense medication to patients based on their own beliefs. [KBOI]
  • A military panel is set to request that the Pentagon overturn its ban on women serving in combat. [NPR]

Keep reading »

Today’s Lady News: Group Complains Nursing Program Teaches Students About Abortion

  • A Christian legal group has filed a civil rights complaint against a Vanderbilt University nursing program for putting a statement on its application that informs students the program will involve interacting with women who may have just had an abortion and suggesting if they cannot handle that, they should consider applying to a different program. “It is important that you are aware of this aspect of care and give careful consideration to your ability to provide compassionate care to women in these situations,” the application states. “If you feel you cannot provide care to women during this type of event, we encourage you to apply to a different track of the Nurse Residency Program to explore opportunities that may best fit your skills and career goals.” The complaint was filed on behalf of an unnamed Mississippi woman. Two Tennessean law experts said Vanderbilt has not actually done anything wrong. [The Tennessean]

Keep reading »

Today’s Lady News: Remembering Christina Green, 9, Victim Of Tucson Shooting

  • A remembrance of Tucson, Arizona shooting victim, nine-year-old Christina Green, who had recently won a seat on her student council and just wanted to meet her local politician, Gabrielle Giffords. (Randomly, Christina is the cousin of “One Tree Hill” actress Sophia Bush.) [Ms. Magazine]
  • Miss England beauty queen Katrina Hodge is deploying for her second tour in Afghanistan. [Styleite]
  • The abortion rate has stalled after 30 years in decline, according to a new study by the Guttmacher Institute, which collects data on reproductive rights. Also, drug-induced (i.e., medical) abortions with RU-486 are on the rise. [Reuters]

Keep reading »

Rosario Dawson Blasts Looks-Obsessed Hollywood

“My whole job is mostly about feeling like I am discriminated against because I am a woman. It is completely OK to [discriminate] outright and out loud — it is wild, but I deal with it. I feel like being an actress, being told to lose weight and be younger — it’s crazy, but it is part and parcel of the game. To say that looks or age or sex doesn’t matter is ridiculous. But I feel lucky in that every single woman pretty much on the planet has to deal with that sense of how she looks, portrays herself, and this and that. We are scrutinized and compared and all of that kind of stuff. That is kind of what it is to be a woman, unfortunately, still to this day. Even with the coups of feminism we are still there. But at least every other woman is going through that. It’s not something extra special that I have to go through. It is just part of my job.”

— “Unstoppable” actress Rosario Dawson on Hollywood holding women like her under a microscope. While it’s true that it’s an image-conscious business for all actors and actresses, it’s no secret that the pressure is especially intense for women. [Daily Telegraph] Keep reading »

Men’s Studies Vs. Male Studies: What’s The Difference?

I took gender and sexuality studies as a minor in college, which is what my school offered instead of “women’s studies.” I assumed at first that they were just being PC with the name. But then when I took the first class, an introduction to the discipline, I realized it truly wasn’t just about women. We learned about constructs like gender and sexuality, yes, but we also devoted a lot of attention to the intersectionality of race, class, religion and able-bodiedness. That introductory instructor encouraged us not to assume gender was what individuals identified with first and cautioned us against ignoring other ways people are oppressed by focusing solely on gender. Gender studies was actually the hip new term for the discipline; “women’s studies,” on the other hand, sounded hopelessly old-school. I took four gender and sexuality studies classes and only one — “Women and The Media” — focused on women almost exclusively (that class was about media depictions). The other courses, however, were far more intersectional and examined all the different ways people can be oppressed; for example, “The History of Prostitution” talked a lot about how female sex workers flourished during Victorian times in part because men felt they had no other outlet.

I never took a “men’s studies” class that focused primarily on men. But if I could go back in time, I might have majored in G&SS instead of minored and taken a course strictly about masculinity. After all, gender is so intersectional and I do want to learn more about that particular construct. Approximately, 100 colleges around the country offer “men’s studies” courses — one would assume in the gender studies, sociology or anthropology departments — and though it’s not offered as a major anywhere yet, the proliferation of these courses is a good sign that in the coming years, masculinity will be critiqued and evaluated just as much as femininity has been by “women’s studies.”

So if G&SS is now incorporating the study of women’s and men’s experiences together, then what the heck is “male studies” about? Keep reading »

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