Category Archives: Money

Cash & Coupling: How To Make A Divorce Suck Less Financially

Last time in Cash & Coupling, we covered how to go into a marriage making financial choices that would benefit you in the event of a future divorce. But what about after disaster strikes and the marriage is over? (I know, we’re thinking real positive around these parts.) Here are five tips designed to help new divorcees keep as much of their finances intact as possible as they bid their husbands adieu. Keep reading »

What’s Your Spending Comfort Zone?

Most of the items in my closet probably cost between $5 and $75. I’m a huge fan of thrift stores, discount stores, and clearance racks. My mom raised me to hunt relentlessly for the best deal, so even when I’m doing fine financially, a $50 price tag will give me pause. A $100 item is a pretty big purchase, one to ponder, put on hold, and perhaps consult with a clergyman about (“But Father, it’s BCBG!”). And with the exception of an ill-advised pair of limited-edition purple Ugg boots my sophomore year of college, I almost never buy anything that costs more than $150. Keep reading »

Crippling College Debt: How Do You Manage Your Student Loans?

Education is supposed to enrich our lives and make us more worldly and learned. But for many of us, higher ed just brings on thoughts of debilitating debt and crashing credit scores. According to the Project on Student Debt, the average 2009 graduate owes around $24,000 after graduation. But that’s nothing compared to the astronomical amount of school debt Kelli Space has. Keep reading »

Money 101: How To Help Your Parents Through The Recession

It seems like the floundering economy has taken its toll on everyone in some way or another. Maybe you ended up in the unemployment line, or maybe your pantry’s stocked with nothing but store-brand food. And while the financial environment may have led you to cringe whenever you look at your checking account statement, our generation is lucky in that we have plenty of time to recover before we’re ready to start thinking seriously about retirement.

But what about your parents? If they haven’t retired already, they’re probably getting close, and they have much less time to recover if the economy took their finances down with it. Knowing how to help your parents can be tricky, but they may be at a point where they really need you. Keep reading »

Cash & Coupling: Divorce In Your Future? Here Are 4 Steps To Take Before You Tie The Knot!

When I think prenup, I think Donald Trump protecting his vast fortune from gold-digging spouses. But this is an outdated point of view. Getting a prenuptial agreement is actually a very savvy move for a pragmatic couple. Prenups are an example of one of the important financial choices women can make from the outset of a marriage to minimize the financial upheaval in the worst-case scenario: divorce. Though few of us see ourselves as future-divorcees, I’ve come up with a few recommendations for preemptive, defensive financial management, just in case. Divorce still typically incurs much more financial harm to women than men. These four tips offer basic, fundamental financial safeguards that are only logical in an age of high divorce rates. Keep reading »

Therapy For Your Pocketbook Episode 12: “Clothes Investment”

In the latest episode of “Therapy For Your Pocketbook,” Susie, a young professional, shares that she sees everything she buys as an investment … like sunglasses and blouses her daughter will wear someday. But, um, she doesn’t have a daughter, yet. Finance Expert Manisha Thakor explains that if you’re in serious credit card debt, the most sound investment you can make is — pay what you owe! That’s a guaranteed return on investment. [Therapy For Your Pocketbook] Keep reading »

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