Tag Archives: books

The Worst Library Books Ever

Two librarians from Michigan, Mary and Holly, have given us yet another website to make Tuesday mornings at the office completely unproductive. Their blog, Awful Library Books, documents the ridiculous books that you find year after year in the $1 bin at your local library’s annual book sale. I laughed hysterically when I saw a hardcover with the title More Great Pantyhose Crafts. The most ridiculous part, aside from the fact that you can make a full-sized hammock from stockings, is that the word “more” is in the title, which implies that there was a volume preceding this one. Keep reading »

An Ode To Nancy Drew

A few years ago, when my parents moved out of the house I grew up in, they went on a major throwing-old-stuff-out spree. For a solid week, I’d get constant phone calls asking, “Can we bring your old My Little Ponies to Goodwill?” (Yes.) “Can we throw out your old report cards from elementary school?” (Um, definitely—why did you keep them in the first place?) My answer was yes, yes, yes, until I got one call. “Can I donate your Nancy Drew books to the library?” my mom asked.

“NO!” I screamed. Keep reading »

Showing Teen Girls How To Rock

Everyone at The Frisky is a hardcore music lover and our tastes range from Taylor Swift and M.I.A. to Sleater-Kinney and Jenny Owens Young. Perhaps the only time we were more passionate about music was when we were in our teens and dreamed of starting a band. Jessica Hopper knows all about that teenage desire to rock and has written The Girls’ Guide to Rocking, giving teen girls today what we would have killed for back in the day. The book promises to teach readers “how to start a band, book gigs, and get rolling to rock stardom.” Keep reading »

Crave: The Pulpwood Queens’ Tiara-Wearing, Book-Sharing Guide To Life (Win One!)

When Kathy L. Patrick got laid off from her job, she opened Beauty and the Book, a combination beauty salon/bookstore. Shortly after, she started The Pulpwood Queens of East Texas, a raucous reading group that requires its members to wear a tiara, hot pink, and leopard print outfits (and now has chapters around the country). This part-autobiography, part-advice book, part-reading list will remind you that good things can come after crappy life events — and that a little silliness goes a long way. [$11.89, Amazon]

We’re giving away five copies of The Pulpwood Queens’ Tiara-Wearing, Book-Sharing Guide To Life, but you have to work if you want one. The five best commenters for this coming week — from today, Friday, July 17 through Thursday, July 23 — will be awarded with one. So, be as clever, smart, and original as you can! Click HERE to read the official rules. Keep reading »

NASCAR-Themed Romance Novels Leave Harlequin Readers Panting For More

I don’t think that I’ve ever read a romance novel. I don’t really go for the mushy stuff. But whatever floats your boat, I always say. I guess I don’t really “get” them. They seem so unbelievable. That’s why when I saw these NASCAR-themed romance novels from Harlequin — yes, I said NASCAR-themed romance novels — I figured it was the Photoshop work of some dude blog. So, I googled around, and, lo’ and behold, Harlequin really does have an entire series of romantic “Stories Set in the World of NASCAR”. With titles like One Track Mind (steamy!), Checkered Past (scandalous!), and Black Flag White Lies (my favorite!), it appears that the racing track is as good a place for hot and steamy literary romances as any other locale. After the jump, read an excerpt from Over the Wall, in which racing team manager Nathan Cargill hires fitness trainer Stacy Evans, breaking his cardinal rule to never mix business with pleasure. Keep reading »

NPR Disses Jodi Picoult And Calls Her Books “Lurid”

I love reading. I might love it more than orgasms, sleeping or eating. And I will read anything, high or low, because I’ve enjoyed “smart books” like Katharine Graham’s autobiography as much as “trashy books” like The Other Boleyn Sister. I just can’t stand people who get on their high horse and sniff that a 10th grader could have written Twilight. It was a good read—who cares?

I’ve read two novels by Jodi Picoult—My Sister’s Keeper and Nineteen Minutes—which were both three-hanky reads about suburban families with troubled kids (cancer in one, a school shooting in another). But NPR has a different perspective on the Picoult oeuvre. Keep reading »

Five Love Lessons From “Gone With The Wind”

Today marks the 73rd anniversary of the publishing of Margaret Mitchell’s epic Civil War novel, Gone With The Wind. I’ve read the book 20 times (that’s 20,960 pages in total, y’all!), watched the movie at least a dozen times, and have gleaned numerous lessons, particularly about relationships, with the turn of every page. I’ll share, after the jump… Keep reading »

A 14-Year-Old Author

I’m 21, and every time I finish up a post for The Frisky, I feel a huge wave of accomplishment. That was until I read about Laura Simula, an author who started writing her first novel at 12-years-old. Her first book, A Broken Yesterday, was just published—and she’s only 14. The book is a 130-page mystery that tells the story of Carrie Foster, a girl struggling with her older sister’s death from bone cancer and, in the process of grieving, uncovers a big family secret. Even more impressive, Simula got her book published on her own. Her parents didn’t even know she sent out the manuscript until the publishing company called to sign a deal. Keep reading »

Crave: “Commencement” By J. Courtney Sullivan

Smith College is unlike any other American university. An all-women’s school, it’s an historically posh place for educating the elite (like alums Barbara Bush, Nancy Reagan, and Julia Child), yet at the same time, it’s a breeding ground for liberal lesbians so intense they’ll risk everything for a cause. You can’t really know what to expect there, which is what four dorm mates find when they start first year. The group, which includes a slightly-smelly radical, a lapsed Catholic, an engaged southern belle, and a prepster, become unlikely friends who navigate this special world where feminism is omnipresent, but comes in different forms from rules for girl-on-girl shower times to protesting sex trafficking. The first half of the book takes place at Smith, where much of the entertainment comes from learning about everyday oddities like acronyms for girls who go gay (SLUGs: Smith Lesbian Until Graduation). The second half turns more serious when the four women graduate and find themselves struggling to maintain their friendships and define themselves as feminist women in the real world.

Commencement may be billed as a great summer read, but it has far more depth than your average women’s lit. While fiction, Sullivan’s bright and witty prose weaves itself around real places—the ivy-covered paths of the liberal arts world and the imposing concrete streets of Manhattan—that feel familiar and relevant to real women. [$24.95, Amazon.com] Keep reading »

Crave: The Celestial Sexpot’s Handbook (Win One!)

Astrosexologist extraordinaire Kiki T. advises Frisky readers every Monday with her FriskyScopes, but if that isn’t enough celestial guidance for ya, she’s got a whole book! The Celestial Sexpot’s Handbook deconstructs men of every sign, telling you how to get and keep him right where you want him: in bed. [$14.99, Amazon]

We’re giving away seven copies of The Celestial Sexpot’s Handbook, but you have to work if you want your sex life to be out of this galaxy. The five best commenters for this coming week — from today, Friday, June 12 through Thursday, June 18 — will be awarded with one. So, be as clever, smart, and original as you can! Click HERE to read the official rules. Keep reading »

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