Tag Archives: books

J.D. Salinger Has Died

Sad face. Earlier today, author J.D. Salinger passed away at age 91. Ever since he published A Catcher in the Rye in 1951, Salinger has been every successive generation’s teenage hero for his spot-on description of 16-year-old disaffection. He gained further acclaim for books like Franny and Zooey (1961) and Raise High the Roofbeam, Carpenters (1963). But in 1965, he stopped publishing altogether. He’d already moved from New York City to rural New Hampshire, and he became a notorious shut-in—refusing nearly every interview ever requested and never making public appearances. “There’s a marvelous peace in not publishing,” he said in one of very few interviews he did do. “Publishing is a terrible invasion of privacy … I love to write. But I write just for myself and my own pleasure.” [EW]
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Dustin Diamond’s “Behind The Bell” Brings TMI To A New Level

Because he wants to give you nightmares for the rest of your life, Dustin “Screech” Diamond has shared all his sordid “Saved by the Bell” stories in his new book, Behind the Bell. And because I’m way too lazy to read the tell-all, thankfully someone else has and pulled out the juiciest bits. Let’s start with the most disturbing information. Dustin claims to have a big penis and says he has put it inside more than 2,000 women. “I’m not Screech. I’m cool,” he says. “I follow no man, and women find me irresistible.” If anyone ever said that to me with a straight face, I would probably barf on him. [11Points]

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All The Deets You Never Wanted On John “Love Lips” Edwards And Rielle Hunter

And you thought you’d heard all the dirty details after John Edwards finally confessed that he is Rielle Hunter’s baby daddy. Au contraire! The Politician, the book by Andrew Young—who you know as the Edwards’ campaign staffer who initially said he was the one doing the horizontal polka with Hunter, before it came out that Edwards was the culprit—comes out next week. NY Daily News has gotten its hands on a copy, and there are some serious zingers in there. For example …
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Graphic Novels Gone Girly

Graphic novels have always suffered a geek taint, a stubborn case of social acne that alienates certain sects of people. There have always been a handful of Comic-Con cuties, but, overall, society has labeled graphic novels a man’s medium. Yen Press has a solution to bring some girl power to the graphic novel. The publisher is taking female-favored heavyweights and adapting them to fit this medium. This year, Yen Press will be introducing the first installments of both The Twilight Saga and Gossip Girl series. Twilight promises to be loyal to the original novels—Yen is even working with author Stephenie Meyer to capture the right money-making, heart-melting formula. Gossip Girl, on the other hand, is a re-imagining of the story with all the classic characters. I don’t think Twihards will have any problem taking to the new medium—heck, they’ll buy anything Forks-inspired. Gossip Girl may be harder to sell. What do you think—will manga-ized Serena and Bella bring a new surge of women to the graphic novel? [EW, MTV]
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Win This! “Us: Americans Talk About Love”

When you pick up a book about “love,” you shouldn’t expect anything. Love is one of those things that’s hard to describe and even harder to understand. We can’t really know what love is until we’re in it, and the love between two people is unique, so even if you’ve been in love, you’ll never understand another couple’s relationship. When I read Us: Americans Talk About Love, edited by social anthropologist John Bowe (published Jan. 5), I mistakenly thought that I’d be reading true love story after true love story, 300+ pages of happy endings. But Us isn’t about love stories; it is personalized experiences with love: all the highs and lows, messiness and simplicity. And talking about love probably turned out better stories. Seriously, I read through this in, like, two days over the Christmas vacation. Keep reading »

Win This! Us: Americans Talk About Love

Love is one of those things that’s hard to describe and even harder to understand. We can’t really know what love is until we’re in it, and the love between two people is unique, so even if you’ve been in love, you’ll never understand another couple’s relationship. Us: Americans Talk About Love lets us peek into strangers’ love lives with 44 stories collected by social anthropologist John Bowe. As told by a homeless thirtysomething, a married aerobics instructor who fell for a woman, a senior who still smooches her husband on a regular basis, a brokenhearted man who has dated more than 300 women since his wife’s death, and more, these oral reports from across the United States prove that love is anything but uniform. [$10.88, Amazon.com]

WIN THIS! We’re giving away a copy of Us: Americans Talk About Love, but you have to work if you want it! Send an email to contests@thefrisky.com with the subject line “Love Book” telling us how you knew you were in love for the first time and how old you were by 11:59 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 14. We’ll pick our favorite response and announce the winner on Friday, Jan. 15. You must live in the U.S. or Canada to win. Keep reading »

5 Reasons I’m Already A Horrible Bridesmaid

I’m going to be a bridesmaid for the first time this summer and don’t have a clue what this entails. I know I’ll be wearing a dress of someone else’s choosing and standing at the front of a church for a long time, but what do I have to do for the bride from now until the wedding day? Who knows? So, when I heard there was a book that would tell me all of the expectations associated with the position, I said, “Send it over!” After reading The Knot Bridesmaid Handbook: Help the Bride Shine Without Losing Your Mind, I feel like I have a lot of work ahead of me; from what I read, being a bridesmaid is practically a full-time job and I didn’t even know I was supposed to do half of the responsibilities mentioned in the book! Keep reading for five things every bridesmaid should know that I didn’t. Keep reading »

Yoko Ono Will Write Her Memoir Before 2015

The thing I remember most about my lame boyfriend from sophomore year of college was his seething hatred of Yoko Ono. According to my ex, the Beatles were the most brilliant band in the world and they only broke up because some hussy brainwashed John Lennon. I just ignored that quirk in his personality at the time. Eventually, though, I realized the Frothing At The Mouth To Blame Yoko For Everything Wrong In The World bandwagon is cuh-razy! (Read Can’t Buy Me Love by Jonathan Gould if you don’t believe me.) Keep reading »

Frisky Q&A: Author Elizabeth Gilbert Talks About Tying The Knot

After her hugely successful book, Eat, Pray, Love, was published, Elizabeth Gilbert settled into a lovely life with the man she met on that personal journey. Both she and the guy, known as Felipe in the book, had been married and divorced before, and they told themselves they weren’t going to get married again; just promising commitment to one other was enough. That is, until the U.S. Department of Homeland Security decided not to let Felipe, a Brazilian with an Australian passport, back into the country after a trip overseas. Sure, the two could have settled down elsewhere, but they wanted to live near family and friends, so the only real option for getting Felipe permission to reenter the United States was for he and Elizabeth to get married.

While they waited for immigration to look into their case — Felipe needed to secure a fiancé visa and wouldn’t be able to return to the States until he was given one — the two bided their time by traveling around the world together, living as inexpensively as possible in Southeast Asia. Meanwhile, Elizabeth looked into this thing called marriage. What was the big deal about it? Why didn’t many last? How has it changed over the years, and what does that mean for us? Beyond the obvious questions, she considered every possible angle, including points of view I had never, ever considered, and wrote about how she came to terms with the institution (because she didn’t have much of a choice) in Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage, which hit stores yesterday. She spoke with The Frisky about the joys and trials of matrimony. Keep reading »

Today’s Lady News: Are Male Novelists Less Macho Now?

  • Controversial women’s issues writer Katie Roiphe penned an essay for Sunday’s New York Times Book Review lamenting what’s happened to male novelists writing about sex. In the ’60s and ’70s, many balked at the ravenous, at times violent, depictions of sexuality in books by writers like Philip Roth, John Updike and Norman Mailer. But the “Great Male Novelists” of today that Roiphe cites—men like Dave Eggers and Jonathan Franzen—write more passively and apologetically about sex. It’s another “let’s blame feminists for everything” type of piece, but it also led me to believe this woman has never heard of Tucker Max. [New York Times Book Review]
  • Legislators in Kansas hope to block $250,000 in federal funds for preventing unwanted pregnancies from going to two Planned Parenthood clinics. Ugh. Please stop being foolish, people! [Kansas.com]
  • Grr. Why is it that women who start their own businesses are called “lipstick entrepreneurs”? Can’t we just be regular entrepreneurs like men? [Times of London]

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