Tag Archives: books

Q&A: Molly Ringwald On Confidence, Beauty, And Blane Vs. Duckie

Back in the ’80s, Molly Ringwald inspired us all to sew our own prom dresses and to lust after the hot senior, even though he had a girlfriend and we’d barely spoken. Um, thanks? Luckily, Molly has some much better life advice to share in her new book, Getting the Pretty Back: Friendship, Family, and Finding the Perfect Lipstick. Molly recently turned 40 and is now a mother of three, and in the book she shares lots of hilarious personal anecdotes. After the jump, The Frisky sits down with Molly and finds out her thoughts on crossing the 40-line, why being a redhead is awesome, and why she still would choose Blane over Duckie. Keep reading »

Win This! Heart Of The Matter By Emily Giffin

Beach season is nearly upon us, and Emily Giffin, author of Something Borrowed and Something Blue (among others) has a new novel out to sate your appetite for quick yet absorbing reads ideal for consuming while laying out in the sun — wearing SPF, of course. In Heart of the Matter, the lives of two very different women in the same Boston suburb become intertwined thanks to an awful accident. Tessa, a mother of two and the wife of a well-known surgeon, and Valerie, a single mother and attorney, take turns telling their sides of the saga, yielding a fascinating dual-perspective. [$14.57, Amazon]


WIN THIS! We’re giving away two autographed copies of Emily Giffin’s new book, Heart of the Matter, which hits stores on Tuesday, but you have to work if you want one. In the comments, tell us your favorite beach read by 11:59 p.m. on Thursday, May 13. We’ll pick our two favorite responses and announce the winners on Friday, May 14. You must live in the U.S. or Canada to win. Good luck!

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Young Hollywood Clamors To Be Cast In “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo”

I’m a little tired this week. The last three nights I’ve been up till at least 2 a.m. reading Stieg Larsson’s The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, the first book in a three-part crime novel series that has been hailed by critics. It was an incredible page turner, in addition to being very well-written. Larsson died in 2004 and all three books were published, first in his native Swedish and then in English, after his death: Dragon Tattoo in 2005, The Girl Who Played With Fire in 2009, and the third, The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet’s Nest, is due out in the U.S. this month. At the center of all three novels is the incredibly compelling character of Lisbeth Salander and Hollywood actresses are reportedly lining up around the block in hopes of scooping up the part in a much-rumored-about U.S. film adaptation. Having just finished the book last night, I have many thoughts on who could play Lisbeth, a role which I believe could be a complete career maker for a young actress. Keep reading »

Book Excerpt: How Marching Band Can Make A Feminist

What exactly does it take for a woman to embrace the idea of being a feminist? Two of our favorite writers, Courtney E. Martin (who wrote Perfect Girls, Starving Daughters) and J. Courtney Sullivan (the lady who brought us Commencement), have joined forces to answer this question. In their awesome new anthology Click: Young Women On The Moments They Knew They Were Feminists, the Courtneys have collected essays from 30 young, female writers. After the jump, read one of them—Colleen Clemens’ description of how marching band made her realize she was the f-word. Keep reading »

Ex-Gawker Editor Emily Gould On Women Writers

I feel bad for Emily Gould. Next week, the former editor of gossip blog Gawker.com will publish her first book, a collection of personal essays called And The Heart Says Whatever. And when I think about what’s going to happen to her, I just want to shield my eyes.

You see, almost two years ago exactly, Emily Gould landed on the cover of The New York Times Magazine for an article published in it, “Exposed: Blog Post Confidential.” If people hated her article (several thousand words about how her sometimes nasty blogging for Gawker complicated or ruined her personal relationships), they hated her cover photo even more: Gould lying on her bed in a tank top, staring up at the camera. The types of internet comments her piece provoked included cyberbullying-ish put-downs like “narcissists,” “narcissistic pipsqueak,” “immature,” “intellectual midget,” “navel-gazing,” “idiots with big mouths,” “undiagnosed psych disorder,” and “Now I understand the timeless appeal of public stoning.” Yeesh.

As another young female writer, watching this scared the crap out of me. I should probably be old enough to know better than to get rattled by all that haterade, but I worry about the young female writers in high schools across the country who see that and then learn, “This is what will happen if I write about myself.” Keep reading »

Book Excerpt: How Hunting Turned Elizabeth Chiles Shelburne Into A Feminist

What exactly does it take for a woman to embrace the idea of being a feminist? Two of our favorite writers, Courtney E. Martin (who wrote Perfect Girls, Starving Daughters) and J. Courtney Sullivan (the lady who brought us Commencement), have joined forces to answer this question. In their awesome new anthology Click: Young Women On The Moments They Knew They Were Feminists, the Courtneys have collected essays from 30 young, female writers. After the jump, read one of them—Elizabeth Chiles Shelburne’s description of how hunting made her realize she was the f-word. Keep reading »

The Rock Bottom Remainders: Writers Gone Rock Star

As the cliches go, critics want to be artists, actors want to be directors, and writers want to be rock stars. Very few of the latter actually go for it—which is why I am so in love with The Rock Bottom Remainders, a band made up of authors like Dave Barry (guitars), Amy Tan (left, vocals), Mitch Albom (keyboards) and James McBride (saxophone). Many others—like Stephen King and Matt Groening—have played with the band during its 18-year existence. As the band’s tagline goes, “We’ve sold more books than The Doors, The Beatles and Rolling Stones together.” They just finished their April 2010 Wordstock tour, which raised money for Haiti, and actually managed to pick up some mediocre reviews along the way. Of the band’s New York show, the NY Post wrote, “During the 100-minute performance, Barry wasn’t Slash, but he was slick in his guitar work. The rest of the ragtag lit rockers in the lineup also fell into the not-so-rarefied air between pretty good and not so bad.” But rave reviews aren’t what this band’s about—they’re more into having fun and raising money for good causes. In all, the band has raised more than $2 million for charity. All I can say is, keep on rockin’ in the literary world, guys. Keep reading »

Book Excerpt: Alissa Quart Dishes On The Moment She Knew She Was A Feminist

What exactly does it take for a woman to embrace the idea of being a feminist? Two of our favorite writers, Courtney E. Martin (who wrote Perfect Girls, Starving Daughters) and J. Courtney Sullivan (the lady who brought us Commencement), have joined forces to answer this question. In their awesome new anthology Click: Young Women On The Moments They Knew They Were Feminists, the Courtneys have collected essays from 30 young, female writers. Read one of them after the jump. And look for a second and third installment later this week. Keep reading »

In A New Memoir, Laura Bush Alleges The Bushes Were Poisoned On Germany Trip

Former First Lady Laura Bush is not known for saying anything too controversial or even interesting. But holy moly, does her forthcoming memoir, Spoken From The Heart, sound like a juicy read! According to The New York Times, Laura Bush will finally open up about the incident when she killed a high school friend in a car crash at age 17 and even defend President Bush’s handling of Hurricane Katrina. But the most interesting part of Laura Bush’s memoir, which is to be released in May, is when she alleges that she, President George W. Bush, and several members of their staff were poisoned on a trip to Germany for a G8 Summit. Yes, poisoned. That’s some really cloak-and-dagger stuff right there. Keep reading »

Book Excerpt: Molly Ringwald And The Stocking Hair Accessory From “Getting The Pretty Back”

The following is an excerpt from Getting the Pretty Back: Friendship, Family, and Finding the Perfect Lipstick by Molly Ringwald — yes, THAT Molly Ringwald — which is on stands today.

When I was seven years old, I was a tall leggy kid with short shaggy hair and permanently stubbed toes, and for a good deal of time I sported a woman’s stocking (my mother’s) attached to the top of my head with two precisely crisscrossed bobby pins. This seemed to be, in my seven-year-old brain, the best solution as to how to exist in California in the seventies with a gorgeous blue-eyed older sister with long blond hair. I was sure that she knew how it tortured me as I lay on the bed and watched her brush her long straight tresses, and then flip it back over to have it land on her back, as if in slow motion. I was mesmerized by the perfection of it. It was the perfect color, the perfect weight. It even smelled nice. (Farrah Fawcett Shampoo, which I’m pretty sure was just Herbal Essences with a picture of Farrah stuck on the bottle.) I asked my mother if I could grow my hair out like my sister’s. Keep reading »

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