Tag Archives: books

Behold, The Malcolm Gladwell Book Generator

Jessica Valenti Q&A
The author of "Why Have Kids" explores parenting and happiness. Read More »
itunes censorship
iTunes censors the word "vagina" in "The Vagina Monologues" e-book. Read More »
Book Club Rules
Five rules for a book club that actually reads. Read More »

The only reason Nothing: What Sandcastles Can Teach Us About North Korean Economic Policy, Slurp: What Kittens’ Tongues Teach Us About Derivatives, and Clarissa: How One Woman Explained It All are not bestsellers is because Malcolm Gladwell has not written them yet.

But he should. He’s really onto something with that kitten book. [Malcolm Gladwell Book Generator]

Frisky Q&A: Jessica Valenti, Author Of “Why Have Kids?” Plus, Enter To Win A Kindle Fire!

Mommy Wars Ceasefire
I want a ceasefire on the mommy wars, because it helps no one. Read More »
On Attachment Parenting
One woman's opinion about attachment parenting. Read More »
Single Mom Speaks
Rick Santorum can kiss this single, working mother's ass. Read More »

Go to the parenting section of any bookstore and there are hundreds of thousands of pages to read on how to do it and setting expectations for what the experiences should be like. Very few tackle the question of why a person, in particular a woman, should/would become a parent, and even fewer from a feminist perspective. That’s why I was so excited to read Jessica Valenti’s new book on the subject, Why Have Kids?: A New Mom Explores The Truth About Parenting And HappinessValenti is the founder of the feminist blog Feministing and author of a number of books, including The Purity Myth and Full Frontal Feminism, as well as a first-time mom to daughter Layla. Why Have Kids? is an incredibly well-researched look at the reality of parenting in America, in particular how having a child affects relationships, career aspirations, and financial security, using statistics, interviews with real women, and Valenti’s own experience as a guide. As someone who definitely does want kids, the book was still incredibly eye-opening, not to mention a total page-turner — I devoured it in a day! I was excited about getting to interview Valenti myself. Check out my Q&A with her — and enter to win a copy of Why Have Kids? and/or a Kindle Fire after the jump! Keep reading »

Brene Brown On Fighting The “Gremlins” Of Snark

Ways To Love Your Body
10 ways to love your body this summer. Read More »
Mirror, Mirror: Rules
Kate comes up with better beauty rules. Read More »

“We judge in areas where we feel insecure, and we pick people who are doing worse than we are. I think when you hear someone snark at someone about something, that’s clear as day that person has some real shame around that issue. When I’m really on that judgment train I have to stop and think, ‘What am I feeling?’ If I’m comfortable in my body, in my work, I don’t care about yours … [These judgements and shame manifest for] women, [through] appearance, body image, motherhood. It’s perfectionism: do it all, look perfect doing it … Women talk about other women’s appearance. We do it unthinkingly, and we’re not awake. If we want to be free and out from under the shame and the heaviness of not being enough, if we want to be valued, we have to practice vulnerability. We have to do the hard things.”

Brene Brown talks to Salon about how to combat snark and other themes in her new book Daring Greatly. If you’re not familiar with Brene Brown, I highly recommend watching her TED talk on the power of vulnerability. It really moved me and shifted some of my thought paradigms. I can’t wait to read her new book, which delves into the “social climate of scarcity” and how we can all live more daringly. I’m glad someone is thinking about these big picture, cultural issues. Should we figure out how to evolve as a society, I think we should throw Brene Brown a party. [Salon]

A Journey Through Northwest London

Book Club Rules
Five rules for a book club that actually reads. Read More »

NW, the title of Zadie Smith’s new novel, refers to northwest London, specifically the neighborhood of Willesden, the area where Smith grew up. Smith revisits this multi-cultural neighborhood, which served as the setting for her debut novel, White Teeth (one of my all-time favorites). “This is the story of a city. The northwest corner of a city,” says NW‘s description. “Here you’ll find guests and hosts, those with power and those without it, people who live somewhere special and others who live nowhere at all.  And many people in between. Every city is like this. Cheek-by-jowl living. Separate worlds. And then there are the visitations: the rare times a stranger crosses a threshold without permission or warning, causing a disruption in the whole system.”The novel follows four Londoners as they try to make adult lives. Exactly the kind journey I can relate to. In true Zadie Smith form, I’m expecting one-of-a-kind characters overlapping in tangled plotlines, exploring such topics as race, class, politics and identity. [$16.17, Amazon]

iTunes Censors The Word “Vagina” In “The Vagina Monologues” E-Book

Searching “vagina” on iTunes for a cheap thrill, basement pervs? You are shit out of luck. iTunes censors the word “vagina” from Eve Ensler’s play The Vagina Monologues on its e-book page in the title and throughout the teaser, spelling “vagina” as “v****a.” Strangely, though, iTunes does not blur the word “vagina” from the book’s cover image — hopefully no one sprains a wrist clutching their pearls upon seeing it. Thank you, Apple, for keeping for keeping us safe from such a dirty, bad word! How would my pretty little head have handled it if I wanted to buy a copy of The Vagina Monologues but I had to see the word “vagina” on your website?  [iTunes.Apple.com]

Paris, For Less Than The Price Of A Plane Ticket

Paris vs. New York
Snag the book, out now. Read More »
365 Days In Paris
Leonora lived in Paris for a year and brought us along with her. Read More »

I am much too obsessed with Paris for my own good, especially considering that I’ve never been there. I’m enamored of the idea of it, so when I do eventually go (and, by God, I will), there is a decent chance that I will be hideously disappointed. With that in mind, I’m significantly less interested in purchasing tickets to Paris than I am in purchasing photography books that portray it as idealistically as I do in my head. Why go all the way there just to be let down when I can sit right here and just pretend that I’m there and it’s awesome? Paris, Portrait of a City, “the true family album of all Parisians,” is just the glossy 544-page photo book I need to sustain my delusions, and with its chronological layout spanning photographers from Daguerre to Cartier-Bresson, it’s a solid lesson in European history, too. We’ll always have Paris, after all. [$69.99, Taschen]

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