Tag Archives: books

10 Book & Tea Combos To Curl Up With

9 Book And Tea Combos To Curl Up With

There are few things in life better than curling up with a good book and a cup of hot tea.  Now that temperatures are dropping and snow is coming, it’s prime time to get your reading and sipping on, so we’ve put together a list of some books we loved this year and recommended teas to try while you’re flipping pages. Hand-selected by the ladies from The Frisky, check out our suggested book and tea combos after the jump! And share yours in the comments… Keep reading »

Bryan Cranston Narrates Children’s Book You Have To F**king Eat

Bryan Cranston Narrates Children's Book "You Have To Fucking Eat"

After Samuel L. Jackson narrated Go the F*ck to Sleep, I didn’t think that another children’s book could make an adult so happy — yet this glorious book has done just that, and it’s now narrated by none other than Bryan Cranston.

I’d highly recommend not reading this to your child if they’re anywhere near the age where they may be speaking their first words, because you might have yourself a little sailor on your hands. Though that might be quite funny at first, your next dinner party with the in-laws could get a little awkward. Read more on Ask Men…

Amazon Released A List Of Its Most Popular Kindle Highlights

Kindle’s popular highlights are pretty much the only reason I would have to read anything on a Kindle anymore. I have successfully boycotted Amazon for books and most other things for the last several months, but I still find myself amazed at the popular highlights, mostly because of their extraordinary mediocrity. I’m pretty sure that most people just highlight something popular because they see that other people have highlighted it, and they think that necessarily means it’s important — and I’m pretty sure that there has to be a cadre of people who are trolling the popular highlights. Some of the highlights in the Song of Ice and Fire books just made no damn sense. There were whole passages of “Hodor Hodor Hodor” that got highlighted by at least tens of readers.

In any event, Amazon released a list of the most popular highlights of all Kindle books, and while most of them are insightful or at least novel on their own (which IMO is the point of highlighting? I could be wrong), others, isolated from their context, don’t make much sense. For example, from Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban:

“THEN YOU SHOULD HAVE DIED!”roared Black. “DIED RATHER THAN BETRAY YOUR FRIENDS, AS WE WOULD HAVE DONE FOR YOU!”

Also — nitpicky, but whatever — the passage of The Hunger Games in which the rules of the Hunger Games are explained isn’t particularly useful. Like, would you quote that in a paper? (I say no, you could paraphrase and cut down your quoted word count.) Would you come back to it as guidance later on? The book hammers the rules home throughout the narrative, so it’s not like you’re needing a reminder. It doesn’t give you any insight about Katniss, it’s just exposition. And yet it’s one of the most popular highlights on Kindle.

Of course, all of this is coming from a woman who does this to books she loves…

…So take from that what you will. I’m just looking at this list and going, all right, these are the most popular highlights on Kindle, but what does it tell us about our reading habits or what makes great literature? I’m just going to hazard a guess: I think that highlighting on Kindle is more a way for the reader to feel like they’re interacting with a real book than it is a method people use for critical reading or even, necessarily, to mark ideas they think are profound or want to come back to. I also think that it’s a way of feeling like you’re part of a reading community (ergo highlighting merely because other people highlighted — I’m not going to pretend I haven’t done it). But I don’t really see that these are identifications of great writing, nor do I think they’re representative of what makes the novels included on the list as popular as they are.

To me this raises the question of how we read, especially how we read popular fiction. What’s your reading and highlighting strategy? I’m very curious.

[The Atlantic]

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What Are Your Favorite Audiobooks?

The only real downside to my new obsession with weaving is that I haven’t yet figured out how to read a book and weave at the same time, so I haven’t been as voracious a reader as usual. I love books and was really missing reading, though not so much that I was willing to drop the loom, so I finally signed up for an Audiobooks.com account. Good news is the meditative impact from weaving actually puts me in the perfect mindset to absorb what I’m hearing. My Audiobooks account also came in handy this weekend while I was unpacking in my new Brooklyn apartment (!!!) and wanted something a little more stimulating than music to listen to. I’ve already “read” Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl (side note: her vocal delivery of THAT passage is just as blase as it appears on the page) and Amy Poehler’s fantastic new book Yes Please. The latter I found to be especially enjoyable as an audiobook because Poehler had a whole list of friends stop by the studio to help her read, plus there were also audio clips from “Parks & Rec” — hell, the whole experience of listening to this book may actually be better than reading it (though regardless of how you “read” it, just DO). I suspect that this may be true of a lot of comedic memoirs, as most of them have the actual comics reading their work, giving them the opportunity to actually perform it.

I’ve listened to a few others audiobooks in the past, including a couple of the Harry Potter books (so good on tape, y’all), but I’m hoping you might have some other recommendations, as I suspect that some books are way better on tape than others. So, hook a girl up. What are some audiobooks you’ve listened to that you loved, or what are some books you’ve read recently that you think would be great as audiobooks? Let’s share!

Lena Dunham Faces Accusations That She “Molested” Her Younger Sister

Lena Dunham

In her new memoir, Not That Kind Of Girl, Lena Dunham tells a couple of stories that include references to her younger sister Grace which are intended to illustrate Lena’s “weirdness” as a child, as well as her youthful obsession with the baby of the family. Instead, critics both on the right and the left say these stories not only cross the line of appropriateness, but suggest that young Lena’s treatment of her sister was sexually abusive, and that including them in her book is an extension of that abuse into adulthood. Keep reading »

I’m Seriously Obsessed With This Anne Of Green Gables-Inspired Wedding Photo Shoot

Anne of Green Gables remains one of my favorite books of all time (I love the entire L.M. Montgomery series, though I wish Anne-with-an-E didn’t end up being saddled with quite so many children, but I digress) and growing up, I watched the PBS movie adaptation more times than I could possibly count. My best friend and I regularly dressed up as Anne Shirley and her BFF, Diana Berry, and I dreamed of a day where I would have enough money to procure a dress with puffed sleeves and a bottle of raspberry cordial. Anne’s love of literature, her romanticism, her stubbornness and her temper were all things I did and still do relate so much to. That’s why I’m kind of obsessed with this Anne of Green Gables themed wedding photoshoot from Canadian (obviously) photographer Jessica Zais. Inspired by her favorite book, Zais worked with local vendors to recreate various recognizable settings from the books, including the White Way of Delight, the Lake of Shining Waters, and Green Gables, where young Anne first came to live with Matthew and Marilla. A real-life couple stood in for Anne and her beau, Gilbert Blythe, with “Anne” donning her trademark poofy bun and a dress with puffed sleeves. The entire shoot is so spot-on, I’m sure that Anne, were she real, would consider Zais to be a real kindred spirit. Click through for a few more photos and check out the rest at Zais’ blog! [via Buzzfeed]

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