Tag Archives: birth control

Your Nose Was A Sexual Organ

Millions of years ago, humans could detect pheromones. We could “smell” each others’ genetic material through particular detectors that have since gone dormant now that we can see in color. It seems that this organ, called the vomeronasal organ, is no longer connected to the brain (does this mean those fragrances with pheromones are pointless?). However, some scientists say that we can pick up on pheromones through our normal sense of smell. But if scientists could find a way to reconnect the VNO, as it’s known, to the brain, you might have what you call a “sex sense” that would allow men to smell when women are ovulating and decide whether or not it’s the right time to have sex. In short, it would change your sex life, and could even be the most effective birth control method ever. [Mental Floss] Keep reading »

Kids Who Have Sex Young Don’t Use Much Contraception

We could never figure out why Jamie Lynn Spears didn’t just go on birth control when she decided to start having sex. Yes, it’s totally possible that she was on the pill and didn’t take as directed — eight out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they don’t follow the instructions — but a survey by the Crisis Pregnancy Agency in Ireland found that first sex among adolescents was linked to low use of contraception (and high levels of regret). [The Press Association, U.K.] Keep reading »

Condoms That Are Good For The Environment And Brazilian “Rubber Tappers”

The Brazilian government inaugurated a factory yesterday that will use the rubber collected by hundreds of small time Brazilian “rubber tappers” to make, well, rubbers. [SIDE NOTE: I propose that anyone who uses condoms as his/her primary form of birth control should be called a "rubber tapper."] The factory has the capacity to produce 100 million condoms a year, and by giving these rubber tappers a livelihood, the government is hoping the trees in the Chico Mendes forest reserve will be protected. [AHN] Keep reading »

An Abacus For Your Menstrual Cycle

A natural birth control method that involves keeping track of your cycle with a set of beads and abstaining from sex from day 8 to 19 was shown to be nearly as effective (when used properly) as the Pill and more effective than the diaphragm or condoms, according to a study of 1,646 women in six different countries. We’re kind of skeptical though, because there were 14.1 pregnancies for every 100 women per year in the study. The main reason the women got pregnant, the researchers found, was that couples knowingly took a risk and had sex on fertile days. Ya think? Being forbidden from having sex 11 days out of every month is probably one of the best aphrodisiacs out there. [Reuters] Keep reading »

Made For A Woman, But Gentle And Anti-Aunty Flo Enough For A Man

Seasonique, the birth control pill that makes women menstruate only four times a year, is being marketed to men. Ads have appeared in laddie magazine Maxim, which is known for its frat-bro attitude and bikini clad spreads, and Spike TV, the channel dedicated to a Late Night Strip Poll. Apparently, the execs marketing Seasonique think guys who like those brands are getting laid, but they’re trying to stop them from spawning. Those men — who are seemingly fascinated by a poop that can kill — are surprisingly grossed out by Aunt Flo coming to stay five days out of the month. Maybe that’s why Seasonique is hoping to get these men to talk to the women in their lives about using their form of birth control. Although the dudes may think they’re in some great hush-hush scheme to banish Aunt Flo, the joke is on them since the same ads are also running on Lifetime. Ha! Ain’t nothing gonna cramp a ladies’ ability to choose her own birth control. Period! [Marie Claire] Keep reading »

Hey, What’s It Like Being A Gynecologist?

After nine years at Brooklyn’s New York Methodist Hospital, OBGYN Josine Veca has seen it all. Here she gives The Frisky her diagnosis of what women want when they stop by.

What are common concerns for women when they come to see you?
It varies by age group. Younger patients, 30 and below, are usually concerned with STDs, birth control, or, if not, trying to prevent pregnancy. As the women get older and are approaching menopause, they’re worried about hot flashes, irregular periods, and symptoms that may be unusual. I’d estimate that 30 to 40 percent are concerned with a mixture of those issues.

How much prying do you have to do or do most women come in with their own specific questions?
A lot of women who come in with their own questions are very comfortable talking about sex. But if they don’t, the subject usually comes up when I’m interviewing them. At first they may be tentative, but the idea is to open communication
Keep reading »

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