Tag Archives: beauty

Beauty Test Drive: Clinique Almost Lipstick In Black Honey

Clinique’s Almost Lipstick in Black Honey is a certified cult classic, the kind of lip color thing that shows up on best-of and must-have lists everywhere for years and years. It’s widely touted as a color that looks good on everybody. I am reluctant to believe that anything is ever one-size-fits-all. Clothing is not. Shoes are never. Clinique, however, believes that Black Honey is a shade that will look good on every skin tone. So, we put it to the test to see if these spurious claims hold any weight. Keep reading »

Watch Another 100 Years Of Hair & Beauty Trends!

Hair
So Many Looks To Try!

Last month, Cut Video released a timelapse film of a model showing off hair and beauty looks from the past hundred years. Now, they’ve released a sequel! Watch model Marshay take us through the decades with her gorgeous looks. Now all we need are Pinterest tutorials for all these styles so that I can inevitably screw them up. You can view both videos side-by-side here, and if you’re into this century-in-a-minute deal, take a look at this video featuring 100 years of dance and style, which is one of my favorite things on the internet ever. [Cosmopolitan]

Beauty IRL: Trust Me, You Should Wear Blush

Beauty IRL: Trust Me, You Should Wear Blush
Don’t fear the blush, even though it is intimidating and weird. It’s the a product many write off as completely unnecessary. but is actually really, really important. Think about it this way: Once you’ve done all that you need to do to your face, you’re left with a beautiful, even-toned canvas — but it’s all the same color. You need some rouge, pumpkin.

3 Problems I Have With Dove’s “Campaign For Real Beauty”

Today, after 10+ years of relentless ads, Dove’s “Campaign for Real Beauty” was named #1 in the Advertising Age list of top ad campaigns of the 21st century for its mission to, according to the magazine, “change societal notions about beauty.” Sorry, but I find that totally lame. I’m also really sick of hearing about this campaign. Of all the ad campaigns in the world, this one is the best? I think the campaign was thought up with positive intentions, and it definitely launched an important cultural conversation about societal norms – but changing norms? I’m not so sold on that one. Dove’s campaign does nothing to challenge the popular notion that beauty should be the most important thing in a woman’s life. It doesn’t aim to stop us from obsessing over looks, it just reframes the conversation about image to a supposedly more positive one. I hesitate to cut down any campaign that gets people thinking about what a monster the media body image machine is, and Dove has surely done some real good by encouraging self-acceptance. That said, it’s important to consider the problematic messages in Dove’s campaign and acknowledge it as a solid first step on a path to more ethical advertising rather than the authority on the subject.

Keep reading »

Beauty IRL: Face Mists Are Fancy Bullshit And I Love Them Anyway

Beauty IRL: Face Mists Are Fancy Bullshit And I Love Them Anyway

There is perhaps no beauty product more superfluous than face mist. Yeah, you kind of need moisturizer, and some would argue that lipstick or eyeliner is a requirement, but a bottle of water that contains mysterious “minerals” and is scented with various flowers that you spray on your face intermittently throughout the day is not necessary for anything, ever. But, as a recent convert to the cult of fancy face water, I’m here to say that there’s some truth to their mystique. Keep reading »

“Barbie Blad” Photo Series Shows America’s Favorite Beauty Queen In A Harsher Light

We’ve all heard the criticism that Barbie dolls warp young girls’ beauty ideals, but what if those little girls got to see a Barbie with a less than perfect appearance? Paris photographer Hamid Blad wanted to take a deeper look at Barbie’s beauty (or lack thereof), so he put together his “Barbie Blad” series, which features Barbies from varying eras in a less flattering light than we’re used to seeing in the toy aisle. His goal was to illustrate the line between real and false beauty, so Blad used the 19th-century collodion image-making process for the photos, which takes longer than modern photography to expose and develop. He also incorporated a UV light that makes the dolls seem a bit less fake and cropped them tightly. Blad styled the dolls’ hair and skin as if they were real models and named them after ’70s runway icons. Keep reading »

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