Pamela Anderson wrote a laughably stupid anti-porn op-ed with a rabbi

Former Congressman Anthony Weiner was linked to his third sexting scandal last week, and predictably enough, his wife and Hillary Clinton’s top aide Huma Abedin responded by filing for a divorce. Meanwhile, known Donald Trump supporter and “celebrity rabbi” Shmuley Boteach, together with former Playboy model Pamela Anderson, responded with an anti-porn rant. While obviously dumb and ill-informed, it’s too funny to ignore.

Published in The Wall Street Journal, the essay presented Weiner as a model family/career-man, a demographic supposedly most susceptible to the great societal ill that is watching people do it, and managed to liken his penchant for sending dirty texts to porn addiction, a problem that is — surprise, surprise! — caused by the liberal media. “[Weiner’s] behavior squares with what we have observed with all too many men, especially in the U.S. or other Western countries that enjoy liberal values and material prosperity,” the dynamic duo writes.

Despite their very different backgrounds, this is something Anderson and Boteach staunchly agree on. “From our respective positions of rabbi-counselor and former Playboy model and actress, we have often warned about pornography’s corrosive effects on a man’s soul and on his ability to function as husband and, by extension, as father,” they say.

While most scientists remain skeptical about porn addiction even being a thing, to Anderson and Boteach, it most certainly is, and one that will destroy every man’s relationships with real women, his children, his life, and the world around him. I cannot stress enough just how apocalyptic and fear-mongering this op-ed is.

The two then cite high rates of porn consumption, which, for whatever reason, terrifies them. They proceed to cling on to the classic cliche of how pornography destroys real-life sexual encounters, and present a rather misleading definition of “addiction” when they describe porn, writing:

“According to the data by the American Psychological Association, porn consumption rates are between 50% and 99% among men and 30% to 86% among women, with the former group often reporting less satisfactory intimate lives with their wives or girlfriends as a result of the consumption.

Nine percent of porn users said they had tried unsuccessfully to stop—an indication of addiction that is all the more startling when you consider that the dependency rate among people who try marijuana is the same—9%—and not much higher among those who try cocaine (15%), according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information.”

Sex is an experience that varies widely by individual, so obviously, claims that porn ruins sex can’t be sweepingly dismissed. But there’s no shortage of studies published in medical journals that contradict the pervasive myth that excessive porn consumption (whatever that is) leads to destimulation and erectile dysfunction. As we know, porn could easily lead to developing unrealistic expectations or being inspired to get a little too ambitious with one’s moves in bed, but it isn’t going to magically lay waste to anyone’s junk.

To state the obvious, at the end of the day, Anderson and Boteach have seriously over-hyped the power and implications of Americans’ indulgence in adult films. Erotic art is frankly as old as time, contrary to how the two identify it as “unprecedented seriousness,” and it’s difficult for me to picture it suddenly destroying human civilization any time soon.

Just as Anderson was (and, of course, still is) at liberty to do whatever she saw fit with her body back when she was a Playboy model, today she’s free to hold whatever bizarre views of the industry she pleases. But maybe don’t write about them in a national publication for the country to mock.