‘Harry Potter And The Cursed Child’ Is Sadly The End Of Harry Potter’s Journey

The London premiere of J.K. Rowling’s play, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, not only marked the unveiling of Rowling’s eighth installment in the Harry Potter series, but also the night Rowling said goodbye to Harry Potter’s spell-binding journey and the whole beloved series. While the Saturday premiere of  Harry Potter and the Cursed Child at London Palace Theatre was met with immediate praise, followed by the assembling of swarms of dedicated fans at bookstores awaiting the midnight release of the accompanying book, the night also marked Rowling’s 50th birthday and the closing of the Potter chapter in her life.

When asked if there would be more books or plays detailing the wonderful world of wizarding, Rowling immediately shut down queries, telling Reuters: “No, no. He goes on a very big journey during these two plays and then, yeah, I think we’re done. This is the next generation, you know. So, I’m thrilled to see it realized so beautifully but, no, Harry is done now.”

This is a reasonable move given the fact that Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was published nearly 20 years ago. The fact that Rowling has maintained faithfulness and relevance for Harry Potter’s journey across an international fan base for two decades speaks to the fact that whatever she touches next will be laced with gold.

Given the immediately positive reception following the premiere of Harry Potter and The Cursed Child, it would be no small surprise if her next project was also written for live theater. The elaborately costumed staging of the eighth installment of the Potter series is a five-hour theatrical marathon that is split into two parts and has already managed to sell out tickets through May 2017.

https://twitter.com/jk_rowling/status/759702086695079936

While there has been talk of a Broadway run of the much hyped play, Rowling made it clear during her red carpet interview that she hopes it travels even further than the well-lit stages of Broadway, telling reporters, “I’d like as many Potter fans to see it as possible. I’d like it to go wider than that.”

Yes, please. I for one volunteer as tribute to go see a staging of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child in the United States, where I solemnly promise to weep for a good three out of the five hours. Hopefully the instant success of her play will push Rowling to get to work on another project so us greedy fans can enjoy more of her perfect brain-nuggets.