Watch This 13-Year-Old Boy Easily Buy A Gun, But Not Lottery Tickets Or Porn

Since the mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando that killed 49 just last week, much has been made of the ease with which most Americans can purchase firearms with the capacity to kill dozens in a matter of minutes. Numerous journalists around the country set to prove how devastatingly lax gun control laws are by legally purchasing firearms for themselves literally in minutes. A journalist in Philadelphia walked away with a AR-15 semiautomatic rifle used in some of the nation’s deadliest mass shootings in just seven minutes, and the AR-15 specifically has been widely purchased since the massacre in Orlando, according to Fox Business. But the strongest evidence that background checks and gun control laws need improvement is quite possibly a 2014 episode of HBO’s Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel, in which a 13-year-old boy buys a gun but is denied porn, cigarettes, beer, and lottery tickets in the state of Virginia.

In the short video filmed with a hidden camera, watch as each convenience store cashier laughs off the idea of selling the child the dangerous, age-inappropriate goods he requests. One cashier points out that the 13-year-old actor “looks like he’s 12.”

After receiving a ride from his mother (what with his being too young to legally drive a car and all), the 13-year-old boy arrives at a gun show, where he hands over some cash and is issued a .22 caliber rifle from a private seller and told “it should shoot pretty good” for him.

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CREDIT: HBOBoxing/YouTube

So, there you have it. It is quite literally easier to buy a killing machine than it is to buy racy magazines or lottery tickets.

Granted, it’s worth noting that in the state of Virginia, you must be 18 years of age to purchase a rifle or shotgun, so this video serves as an unfortunate example of how even when protective regulations exist, that doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll be followed. If anything, this is indicative of the need for more oversight to hold gun sellers accountable to ensure regulations like, oh, I don’t know, checking the age of a prospective customer are followed.

Last week, Democratic senators led a 15-hour filibuster in an effort to reform current gun laws. Specific reforms they pushed for include barring individuals on the government’s terrorist watch lists from buying guns, which would prohibit gun sales to anyone with suspected ties to terrorist activity regardless of whether or not they have been found guilty, and expanding background checks. Republicans responded by introducing two of their own gun control measures, but all four are expected to fail on the Senate floor Monday.