Amy Adams On ‘American Hustle’: I Knew I Was Being Paid Less But Still Agreed To Do It

Bronwyn Isaac | March 3, 2016 - 5:00 pm

The frustrating reality of the pay gap is nothing new, but hearing Jennifer Lawrence recently speak on how the pay gap touches even those in the privileged upper echelons of Hollywood proved that there is no income bracket where this shit magically disappears.  Should this fact discourage women from accepting gigs unless they’re paid equally? According to the actress Amy Adams, who co-starred in American Hustle with Jennifer Lawrence, absolutely not.

Unlike J-Law, who was unaware that the movie was paying her less than her male co-stars until the deal was sealed, Adams went into the project fully aware and made the express decision to leave it be. This wasn’t a matter of Adams not recognizing the bullshit of unequal pay so much as it was a decision to not pick this battle. Amy said:

“I didn’t speak about it before and I’m probably not going to speak about it forever, because I disagreed with… not Jennifer per se, but people who had opinions on how women should go about negotiating. The truth is we hire people to negotiate on our behalf, men and women… I knew I was being paid less and I still agreed to do it because the option comes down to do it or don’t do it. So you just have to decide if it’s worth it for you. It doesn’t mean I liked it.”

She went on to clarify that her stance isn’t meant to be anti-feminist or in disagreement with Jennifer Lawrence’s valid points about inequality, but rather reflects her personal decision to set clear financial expectations of what she’ll accept as payment, regardless of how it compares to her male counterparts.

“I’m really proud of Jennifer,” she emphasized,”What I liked is that it was not necessarily about getting paid, or not getting paid. It’s like we [women] have been conditioned to not be controversial, to not cause problems. It’s about finding your voice.”

While there is much to be said about whether women with a Hollywood platform fighting for pay equality is less or more important considering the immense amount of money and privilege they already have access to, in the case of Amy Adams it’s simply not the battle she’s choosing to pick. Though that decision is maybe a symbol of her actual privilege, live and let live!

 

(Bustle)