SWIPE LEFT: Tinder Dirtbag Scammed Women For $26,000 With Fake Cancer Claims

HOT ONLINE DATING TIP! If you swipe right on someone on Tinder, or otherwise chat up a potential love interest online, and then said potential love interest starts trying to get you to loan them money for their sister’s cancer treatments, that person probably doesn’t so much want to fall in love with you as much as take your money.

Such was the case with Brandon Kiehm, an NYC dogwalker, who made up a fake profile for the purposes of swindling ladies out of their hard-earned cash with his tales of woe. Kiehm posed as Tristan Acocella, a 35-year-old Goldman Sachs banker who was selflessly trying to take care of a sister with cancer.

After meeting one woman in July of 2014 and “dating” her for three months, Kiehm told her his wallet had been stolen–which was a problem, because he needed to pay for his sister’s cancer treatments. Said woman lent him $14,000, in exchange for which he gave her a bad check.

(As a person who has lost her wallet a truly embarrassing amount of times in her life, I can tell you right now that unless you need money immediately and your bank is closed, you really don’t need to borrow money from anyone. The bank can verify who you are and give you a temporary card. So, if anyone tells you they need $14,000 immediately for cancer treatments because they lost their wallet, they are definitely full of it.)

A few months later, he pulled the same scam on another woman, except this time claiming that it was his mother that needed the money for cancer treatments and took her for $12,000.

People have been pulling cons like these since the dawn of personal ads, and will likely continue to try for the rest of time immortal (although, if we ever get single payer they’ll have to figure something else out other than cancer). It’s one of the easiest and cruelest confidence tricks in the world, since it plays on people’s goodness and their desire to trust people and to have someone to love them.

Hopefully stories like this will make people a little more skeptical of con-artists like this jerk. Being skeptical isn’t fun and it isn’t romantic, but it sure could save you a couple thousand dollars.

[NYMag]