You Can Now Study Selfie Theory At USC

Best:

Read about 15-year-old Elise By Olsens, whose beautiful, glossy magazine Recens celebrates youth subcultures with the mission of standing in support of binary-busting and against consumer culture. Her advice to young people: “Focus and stick to your own opinions. Do not focus on consuming if you are against the future of a commercial fashion industry – don’t show fur if you are against animal abuse, for instance. Listen to yourself, and know that you have the courage to affect others. Use your voice.” [It’s Nice That]

Worst:

Human Rights Watch has released a report about the treatment of mentally ill prisoners in U.S. prisons, and it is appalling. Most prison employees aren’t trained to deal with mentally ill people, who are less able to comply and cooperate with staff. Their mistreatment has resulted in horrific abuse, injury, and death. The solution is more community mental health resources, but those resources are increasingly being cut out of local budgets. [Washington Post]

Weirdest:

The University of Southern California is offering a class that’s titled “Writing and Critical Reasoning: Identity and Diversity,” but is actually about selfies. Associate Professor Mark Marino says that the course is about how people construct “an image of their identity – their gender, their ethnicity, their sexuality, their socioeconomic status” through selfies. I guess it’s probably more legit than the college courses on “The Simpsons,” right? [BBC]

Coolest:

In light of the Mr. Brainwash collaboration with Rayban, here’s a history and explainer of the relationship between street art and fashion over the last several decades. Keith Haring collaborated with Vivienne Westwood in the 80s, Banksy makes a neat profit off of t-shirts printed with his designs, and conversely, it’s apparently a thing for celebrities to deface their own very expensive purses. The consensus seems to be that street art has become a stylized non-protest over the last 40 years, so it’s fair game for fashion. Fair enough? [The Guardian]


[Image via Shutterstock]