Arizona Gets Strict On “Revenge Porn”

DIY Porn Tips
How To Empower Yourself Through DIY Porn
How to empower yourself through DIY pornography. Read More »
revenge porn king busted
todays lady news
The host of IsAnyoneUp has been caught by the FBI. Read More »
Ellen On Feminist Porn
Ellen Page Gets Hot And Bothered For Feminist Porn
Ellen Page says "feminist porn is crucial." Read More »
revenge-xxx-050214

This week, Arizona’s Republican Governor Jan Brewer signed a law cracking down on so-called “revenge porn,” classifying it as a sex offense. “Revenge porn” consists of sexual photos or videos which are posted online without the person’s consent. Generally speaking, ex-boyfriends or jilted partners post intimate images or videos of ex-girlfriends, which go up along with the women’s full names, addresses and employers. The aim is to ridicule humiliate their victims.

AZ’s strict new law makes “revenge porn” a felony, establishing an initial 18 months in prison, or two-and-a-half years in prison if the person in the image can be easily identified. It will apply to any “photograph, videotape, film or digitial recording of a person” and makes it a crime to “disclose, display, distribute, publish, advertise or offer.” It doesn’t include an exception for photos deemed by the press to be in the public interest, such as celebs’ or politicians’ sexy photos. It does make an exception for “voluntary exposure in a public or commercial setting.”

New Jersey also has a “revenge porn” law on the books, which, as Salon notes, was pegged to the suicide of gay Rutgers student Tyler Clementi (whose hookup was streamed online by his roommate). California passed a “revenge porn” law last year. CA’s law doesn’t classify the distribution of “revenge porn” as a felony, though, and had huge loopholes, such as omitting any “selfies” or photos that the victim took herself or himself. In other words if you took the picture of your own boobs that your ex-boyfriend then posted on the Internet, you can’t do anything about it. It also requires that the poster intended to cause emotional distress to the victim, which can be tricky to prove and also doesn’t encapsulate all the reasons someone might post an image online. Forbes has a good roundup of all of the CA law’s loopholes, which it concluded really “doesn’t do much.”

Ten states total currently outlaw revenge porn, mostly as misdemeanors like harassment or disorderly contact. Many more states have other bills coming up, which involve delicate consideration of First Amendment issues. (The Christian Science Monitor brings up Anthony Weiner’s dick pic sexting scandal as an example.) But on the whole, I’m pleased that Arizona, not a state generally known for being forward-thinking on any issue, is being so direct with its message.

[Christian Science Monitor]
[Raw Story]
[NPR]
[Forbes]
[Salon]

Email me at Jessica@TheFrisky.com. Follow me on Twitter.

[Image of Internet porn via Shutterstock]

Posted Under: , , , , , ,
Comments Off
  • Zergnet: Simply Irresistible

  • HowAboutWe

  • afc-right-ad

  • Popular
  • afc-right-ad-2

  • We’re Loving