“Jem And The Holograms” Was Deeper Than We Thought

“Just because the show was for kids, I would never write down. I would write the kind of deep, rich story that I would like to watch – just trusting it would communicate to the viewers, and it did. The characters were rich, and deep, and had a lot of life to them, a lot of threads… It was like a big, grand soap opera for kids. Also, I’ve found that the basic sense of someone who has two identities… That resonated with a lot of the viewers. There was just something about that fundamental essence of figuring out who you are, and being torn between two identities – particularly, I would have to say for a lot of gay viewers. I think it struck a very, very strong note for a lot of young gay people who were struggling with their own identity at the time.”

– Christy Marx, the creator of “Jem and the Holograms,” talks about the lasting power of the show. I totally missed the deeper level of Jem at the time. I mean, I was in the single digits. I loved Jem because I was already performing at the time. I related to the idea of being able to take on a different identity on stage. Also, her clothes were amazing. [MTV]